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4 Types Of Interview Questions PhDs Will Need To Answer

The 4 types of questions PhDs are asked during job interviews

Written by Isaiah Hankel, Ph.D.

Failing an interview is awful.

It’s awful because most of the time you don’t know you’ve failed it.

Until you get ignored.

Days, and sometimes weeks, go by without hearing anything after the interview.

You’ve sent a follow-up email after the interview.

You’ve sent a handwritten thank-you note.

You’ve tried connecting with the people you met on LinkedIn.

But all you hear is crickets.

You hear nothing.

Then, eventually, someone tells you that the position has been filled.

Someone else got the job.

What did you do wrong?

You ask this question to the hiring manager but they don’t give you an answer.

You know you did something wrong because you didn’t get hired.

Why won’t they just tell you what you did wrong?

This is what happened to me…

I shook hands with the president of the company and the head of the R&D department.

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Best Industry Transition Articles Of The Week For PhDs (December 25th, 2016)

Best Industry Transition Articles For PhDs June 20 2015

Every week we scour the Internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to.

We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, transferable skills, interviews, academic blues, and industry positions.

Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are…

Top Overall

*Activate Your ‘It’ Factor For Job Search Success* – David G. Jensen

Networking

TOP Four Easy Ways To Make A Memorable First Impression ...

5 Strategies Life Science PhDs Use To Get Hired

How life science PhDs are getting hired

Written by Catherine Sorbara, PhD

Most people fail to come to terms with the amount of effort that is needed to find a job.

In fact, searching for a job can feel a lot like a full-time job in itself.

If you don’t have a strategy in place, you can be putting in a lot more overtime hours than you need.

That was me, when I first started looking for alternative careers outside academia.

For one, I procrastinated.

I mean, I thought about looking for a new career.

But really, I wasn’t even trying.

I was too locked into finishing my thesis and graduating.

Planning and executing a career strategy seemed like just one more thing to do, and I was already maxed out.

Plus, I thought I had time.

It wasn’t until my thesis was defended that I really gave it an honest effort.

That was mistake number one.

I had not built a network and, at that time, had moved to a new country where I did not know anyone.

I panicked more than I strategized.

When I wasn’t panicking, I was avoiding.

I sent out resumes and trolled the Internet, wondering w...

Best Industry Transition Articles Of The Week For PhDs (December 18th, 2016)

Best Industry Transition Articles For PhDs June 20 2015

Every week we scour the Internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to.

We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, transferable skills, interviews, academic blues, and industry positions.

Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are…

Top Overall

*Enhancing Graduate And Postdoctoral Education To Create A Sustainable Biomedical Workforce* – Cynthia Fuhrmann, Ph.D

Networking

TOP Read more

7 Deadly Mistakes PhDs Make When Networking For A Job

7 common mistakes when networking for a job

Written By: Sean Mac Fhearraigh, Ph.D.

Networking has a bad reputation amongst most academics.

It is synonymous with being pushy, overbearing, and being an overall pest.

PhDs are independent thinkers who like to believe that technical skills and good publications alone will lead them to success.

Yet, when it comes to getting an industry job, networking is crucial.

The good news is, you’ve probably done a lot of networking in academia without realizing it.

For example, have you ever sourced reagents from other labs or got advice on a tough protocol?

That’s networking.

Networking is easier than it sounds — if you do it right.

And that’s a big “if.”

If you’re like me, you’ve probably been making a lot of networking mistakes in academia over the years too.

I remember one incident following my PhD when I targeted a lab that I knew I wanted to do research in.

I didn’t have the publications to get me through the door, so I knew I had to meet the professor and make a great impression to make sure I landed the position.

So I emailed him my resume (just like the 3...