Skip to content

Transferable job skills are essential for getting into any top industry position.

The problem is most PhD students and postdocs do not fully understand what transferable skills are or how to develop them. More importantly, many of these PhDs are unaware of which transferable skills are sought after by biotech and pharma hiring managers and recruiters. Ignoring these skills can seriously hurt a PhDs chances of landing a job in the biotech or biopharma sector. A survey of major biotech and biopharma companies found that in spite of having the appropriate academic degree and academic qualifications overall, new graduates were hired for less than 15% of all available entry-level job opening. The employers polled in the survey stated that the primary reason for this was the graduates lack of transferable skills. In particular, the main skills these candidates lacked were teamwork, information management, problem-solving, communication and THIS one other skill…

Read More

The idea that focusing solely on your thesis and publications will guarantee you a job in industry is a myth. This myth has kept many graduate students from exploring careers and networking with professionals during graduate school. If you put all of your focus on your research during graduate school and neglect to explore other careers or develop skills that are valued in industry, you will leave tens of thousands of dollars on the table. By reframing your graduate school experiences and challenges into learning opportunities, you can make the most out of graduate school and set yourself up to get an attractive job offer in industry. The key is to value networking, transferable skills, and the job search process itself above merely finishing your thesis and wrapping up your publications. Here’s how.

Read More

If you’re a woman and have a PhD or are on your way to having one, the future is yours. The only thing that can hold you back is yourself. The first step to transitioning into industry as a female researcher is knowing your worth and refusing to feel like an impostor. The second step is knowing what you’re up against. The odds may be against you but you can still transition into the non-academic career of your choice by asking the difficult questions and finding a supportive network. By wearing many hats, refusing to apologize for the fact that you’re a woman, and celebrating even the smallest victories—you will be successful. Women scientists are desperately needed in industry, but you have to step up and seize the position you want. Here’s how.

Read More

There’s nothing better than a positive principal investigator who inspires and trains you to be a better scientist. At the same time, there’s nothing worse than an abusive investigator who refuses to support your career. If your academic advisor is mistreating you, don’t sit there and do nothing. Don’t keep giving away more and more of your rights and self-respect until you have nothing left. Instead, start setting strong boundaries for yourself and your career. Speak up about what’s happening and begin making plans for your future. Know your rights and know what’s expected of both you and your advisor. By taking the right steps, you can protect yourself and your career from any kind of abuse. Here are 7 steps to take when your academic advisors starts working against.

Read More