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Whether or not you understand how negotiating works, it is being used against you.

This is especially true when you’re applying for an industry job, interviewing, or vying for a promotion. The problem is that most people, especially PhDs, don’t know how to negotiate salary. These people don’t understand how negotiation works or why it’s important so they refuse to do it. The problem is that refusing to negotiate can severely limit your career success. Being willing to negotiate, on the other hand, can push your career forward. This is, in part, because your starting salary and career trajectory are tightly linked. Here are 12 tips to help you negotiate a higher salary contract.

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Every week we scour the internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to. We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, transferable skills, interviews, academic blues, and industry positions. Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are here.

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Every week we scour the internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to. We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, transferable skills, interviews, academic blues, and industry positions. Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are here.

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Every PhD knows the importance of publishing in academia.

Being a scientific editor allows you to facilitate the communication of scientific advances and while continuing to learn new concepts. According to the Max Planck Society, global scientific output doubles every nine years. A recent STM report shows that the publishing industry employs 110,000 people globally. Scientific curiosity is not diminishing. As a result, distributing scientific information will always be of great importance. Publishing may not be important in industry, but it is an industry in itself and scientific editors are the driving force behind this industry. However, there are some misconceptions in academia about what scientific editors do. If you’re interested in transitioning into a scientific editor position, make sure you know these 5 facts.

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Every week we scour the internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to. We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, transferable skills, interviews, academic blues, and industry positions. Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are here.

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As a PhD, you can’t afford to ignore the facts.

Things are NOT getting better in academia. The number of tenured professors at universities is steadily declining. Even worse, a large portion of non-tenure-track professors live below the poverty line. Yet, reports show that PhDs in the Life Science Industry (not in academia) earn more average income than those employed in other sectors of the economy. The problem is not that research isn’t needed anymore. Research and research scientists are in high demand. The problem is academia. It’s time to start leveraging your skills to get the research job (and income) you deserve. Here are 5 things to keep in mind when pursuing a career as an industry research scientist.

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Every week we scour the internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to. We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, transferable skills, interviews, academic blues, and industry positions. Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are here.

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Networking correctly is not easy.

If you’re networking correctly, you’re investing your time and energy into developing long-term professional relationships. Networking takes work. It takes effort and engagement. You can’t merely show up to an event, throw a few business cards at people, and expect to get a strong job referral. Instead, you have to show up, build rapport, and offer value even when you feel like you have nothing to offer. The worst thing you can do is show up to an event and beg for connections, cling onto one person the whole night, or check your phone repeatedly. You should not only avoid these people at your next networking event, you should also ensure that you don’t become one of them. Here are five people NOT to turn into at your next networking event.

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