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Are you still doubting the value of networking in your job search? A report in the Academy of Management Journal showed that successful industry professionals spend 70% more time networking than their less successful counterparts. And, Forbes reported that 80% of job openings are never advertised. The only way to achieve success and to have access to the hidden job market is to network with people in industry. But, are you networking to the fullest? If you are only networking online, from the comfort of your couch, then you are not getting all the benefits of networking. In-person contact is extremely valuable in relationship-building (a.k.a. networking). According to Harvard Business Review, a request made in person is 34 times more successful than one made via email. This is because when you speak in person, you are able to communicate so much better than just via text.

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First of all, 85% of jobs are filled through networking (HubSpot). So, if you aren’t networking, you only have access to a small fraction of the total available jobs. But, what does your networking look like? Are you just sending cold messages on LinkedIn, or are you truly investing in people? The only way to make real connections that can last a long time is with in-person networking. Because networking in person is the only way you can fully communicate with another person. Pioneering work by Albert Mehrabian demonstrated that 55% of communication is body language, 38% is the tone of voice, and 7% is the actual words spoken (Psychology Today). Once you are present in person with someone, you have the opportunity to really connect with them — that is, to build a lasting professional relationship. In-person networking, although powerful, can be difficult for many people. So, you need to learn the right and the wrong way to network at in-person events.

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Every week we scour the internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to. We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are here.

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Do you know what behavioral interview questions are? Are you aware of the importance of behavioral questions during the interview process? In this episode of Cheeky Scientist Radio, we interview Anne Marie Segal, who is an executive career coach and best-selling author of Master The Interview and Know Yourself, Grow Your Career. She will shed…

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Networking is what will get you hired in industry. 40% of hires come from referrals, but only 7% of applicants even have a referral (Undercover Recruiter). Very few people get referrals because doing so requires effort. Getting a referral requires you to put yourself out there, to meet new people, and to network. This includes in-person networking, which can be tough for introverts. But, the rapport you can build and the value you can gain from physically meeting someone is much higher than what is possible through online networking. A request made in person is 34 times more successful than one made via email (Harvard Business Review). That is a huge difference. Do not underestimate the power of in-person networking and make sure that it is an integral part of your job search strategy.

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Every week we scour the internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to. We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are here.

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In this interview with Chris Drummond, Ph.D., he details how he made the transition from being an undervalued postdoc to an invaluable part of an industry team. He enjoys the pace, resources and real-world application of working in industry. As a PhD, he knows the struggle you face when trying to leave academia and shares great advice on how you can make the transition.

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75% of employers attend career fairs held at universities (Glassdoor). These career fairs provide an opportunity for job candidates and employers to get valuable face-to-face interactions that they might not have had otherwise. It can be difficult to connect with potential employers face-to-face outside of these events. But, this in-person contact is very valuable. A request made in person is 34 times more successful than one made via email (Harvard Business Review). 34 times more successful! The mere opportunity to speak face-to-face with your target company at a career fair improves your chances of getting hired. But, you have to know how to make the most of these career fair events.

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Every week we scour the internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to. We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are here.

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Have you ever wondered what a Technology Transfer office does? Are you interested in helping innovators bring technologies to the marketplace? In this episode of Cheeky Scientist Radio, we interview Ananda Ghosh, Ph.D., who talks to us about his transition into Technology Transfer and how to best position yourself for a career in this field.…

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To get hired as fast as possible, in-person networking should be a high priority in your job search. The words we choose when communicating are only 7% of how we actually communicate (Psychology Today). And, when networking online through emails and messaging, word choice is the only part of your communication that is coming across. The most important components of how we communicate — such as body language, facial expressions, and tone of voice — are left out of online networking. That means the only way to fully communicate with someone is in person. As PhDs, many of us are introverted, and we tend to avoid in-person networking events. Instead, we choose to network online, where we can just write — which is something PhDs are experts at. But, merely networking online is not enough. Approximately 80% of job openings are never advertised (Forbes). You have to network and meet new people in order to learn about the majority of job openings.

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Every week we scour the internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to. We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are here.

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Employee referrals account for 72% of all interviews (Society of Human Resource Management), and 1 out of every 5 candidates with a job referral gets hired (Undercover Recruiter). If you are not on LinkedIn building up your network and investing in your connections, you are missing out on a huge resource that will boost your job search. Not only that, networking often leads to referrals which will benefit you after you get hired as well. A referral raises wages of workers in their first year at the firm by 6.7 ± 3.4% (The Review Of Economic Studies). That’s an increase in starting salary from $75,000 to $80,000 per year. Companies place a lot of value on referrals because ultimately, job candidates who come from referrals make better employees. As a PhD, you already have many advantages over other job candidates, and with a referral you will immediately become a top candidate. But, you have to put in the work.

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Referrals are the number one source of hires and are routinely how companies bring in the highest quality employees. Industry companies know how valuable referrals are, and they reward employees who refer successful new hires. 65% of companies have built-in bonus programs for rewarding employees who refer a successful job candidate (World At Work). Companies want to hire job candidates who come with referrals because they know they are more likely to find high quality employees. And, having a referral will benefit you in the long term, too. Job candidates who were referred by a business contact can see up to an $8,200 boost in starting salary (PayScale)!

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