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Every week we scour the internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to. We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are here.

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51% of recruiters rated having an employee referral as an important factor in hiring, while 89% of recruiters rated company culture fit as an important factor in hiring (Jobvite). Through informational interviews, you can gain referrals and learn how to demonstrate that you are a good culture fit for a company. Having a referral will not only increase your chances of getting hired, it will also increase your starting salary. Having a referral from a business contact increases annual salary by up to $8,700 (Payscale). Informational interviews provide opportunities to build relationships with industry professionals. By first meeting with them with the intention of learning more about their role, and hearing their story, you begin to build rapport. And, as you maintain contact with that person and continue to add value to them, you will be able to ask for a referral when you need it. But, the largest benefit you gain from informational interviews is learning what it’s like to work at a company or in a specific job, day after day.

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It takes hard work and perseverance to get hired in industry. For most positions, a candidate will have 3 interviews before a company decides to hire them (Management Recruiters International Network). But, for certain positions, candidates may have 5 or more interviews before getting hired. So, if you have more than one interview, don’t get discouraged, as this is completely normal. Additionally, the average time it takes someone to get a job is 84 days (Talent Works). Now, 84 days is a long time, especially if you are unemployed. But, that number is not specific for PhD-level positions. For PhD-level positions, it can take even longer to get hired. For example, it can take more than 150 days for a mechanical engineer to get hired. So, you must be resilient in your job search. Keep pushing forward and realize that it’s normal for a PhD-level job search to last many months. Apply the fight and drive that you developed as a PhD to your job search.

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Every week we scour the internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to. We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are here.

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Are you interested in starting your own company? Have you ever wondered what skills are needed to be a CEO? In this episode of Cheeky Scientist Radio, we interview Laura Motta-Mena, Ph.D., who talks about her transition from her postdoc to CEO of her own startup and how she was able to achieve it. In…

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You must realize that you are not the only one searching for a job. 51% of employees are looking for a new opportunity (Gallup). And, every corporate job opening attracts approximately 250 applicants (Glassdoor). But, this number is often much higher for companies like Johnson & Johnson, Allergan, and Celgene etc., where they will get thousands of applicants per position. But, only one applicant will get hired. How do you become that one applicant? Well, it starts with a referral. A referral can land you an interview. But, once you are in front of the hiring committee, it’s all on you. How do you stand out from the other candidates? How do you show your value as a PhD? You do this by preparing for your interview with the same intensity that you prepared for your thesis defense.

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Every week we scour the internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to. We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are here.

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A top concern for 55% of PhDs is their career path (Nature), because many graduate schools do not teach or prepare PhDs for careers outside of the university setting. A survey of more than 800 university staff members from 226 institutions found that 62% of respondents reported that only 44% of universities have professional development programs that prepare graduate students for non-academic careers. And, students are the ones who are suffering (Council of Graduate Schools). Only 33% of graduate students felt that their university provided useful advice about careers outside academia (Nature). If your university is not going to teach you about the opportunities that lie outside of academia, then you are going to learn about them yourself. And, conducting informational interviews with industry professionals gives you a direct line to what is happening in industry.

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Every week we scour the internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to. We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are here.

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Do you know what happens after submitting a job application? Would you like to learn how to apply for industry jobs strategically? In this episode of Cheeky Scientist Radio, we interview Darren Ferreira, R&D Talent Acquisition, with experience at Johnson & Johnson and Roche, who explains to us the recruiting and hiring processes in a…

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The average work week is 38.7 hours long and the average American works an average of 46.8 weeks in a year (Pew Research). There are only 52 weeks in an entire year. Ultimately, your workplace is where you will spend 90% of your year. Before you make a commitment to spend so much of your time somewhere, you need to do your research. One of the biggest things you need to understand is company culture. Company culture is everything from how the company is organized, to how they communicate, to how they dress — and, it’s all important. 89% of hiring failures are due to poor cultural fit (Forbes). Poor cultural fit leaves an employee feeling out of place and unsatisfied. Informational interviews, which often led to referrals, combat this issue. And, when you do decide to work for a particular company, having a referral and an understanding of the company will increase your job satisfaction level by 13% (Undercover Recruiter).

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Every week we scour the internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to. We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are here.

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