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In biotech and biopharma the demand for talented employees is high and hiring is up (Forbes and Biospace). But it’s not just biotech and biopharma hiring PhDs. Many other large companies hire lots of PhDs. Amazon employs 14,663 PhDs, Google 9,136 PhDs and Facebook 1,943 PhDs (Paysa). Your PhD is in demand in industry. But in academia there is an oversupply of PhDs and not enough professor positions to go around. In just one year, 54,904 PhDs were granted in the United States alone. That’s a huge number (NSF). This creates a huge disparity in the number of PhDs and the number of available professorships. The math just doesn’t add up, and many PhDs find themselves stuck in a dead-end postdoc making half the salary that they are worth. But doing a postdoc is not the only option for PhDs. There are many industry positions where PhDs are valued, where you can do meaningful, impactful work, and make a nice paycheck at the same time.

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Every week we scour the internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to. We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are here.

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In this episode of Cheeky Scientist Radio, we have on Steven Kotler Director of Research at the Flow Genome Project and expert on peak performance divulges how PhDs can improve both their job search and career success.
Steven’s work with flow states and optimal performance is incredible, you won’t want to miss this episode.

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You are being judged from the moment an employer learns about you as a potential candidate. Before they even speak to you, they will check your resume and your online profiles. But you are a PhD, so you look great on paper. You are highly qualified and skilled. But, the interview is the key next step, because employers don’t want to hire you just based on your skills, they need to know that you will work well at their company. And according to Undercover Recruiter, 33% of bosses know within 90 seconds of an interview if they are going to hire someone or not. You must be ready as soon as you set foot onto the company’s property. They will immediately start to evaluate your fit for the company culture.

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Every week we scour the internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to. We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are here.

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In this episode of Cheeky Scientist Radio, we have on Dr. James Gould from Harvard University, an experienced career consultant who actively coaches postdoctoral fellows and encourages them to consider new career options. He shares great insights into how PhDs and Postdocs can leverage their unique skills and find a rewarding career.

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Behind every job opening there is a person who will decide who gets hired. A person who you will need to make a connection with and prove that you are the right fit for the job. But your efforts to connect with that person should start way before you are in the interview. You should start by networking with people who work at the companies where you want to have an interview, where you want to get hired. You should start networking with the intention of getting a referral.

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Every week we scour the internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to. We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are here.

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LinkedIn is the largest and most popular online professional networking platform. According to LinkedIn, there are more than 30 million companies represented on LinkedIn and more than 20 million job openings listed. There is so much opportunity for you on LinkedIn. To ignore this platform will put you at a major disadvantage in your job search. You need to have a LinkedIn profile so that employers can find you online. The Society For Human Resource Management reported that 94% of recruiters use LinkedIn when finding job candidates online. So recruiters are actively looking for job candidates. But you need to find a way to stand out to recruiters because as of this year LinkedIn has 590 million users, and the key to standing out is to be active.

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Every week we scour the internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to. We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are here.

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Nature reported that in just 2 years the number of science postdocs alone grew by 150%. Universities are graduating huge numbers of PhDs every year and these highly trained PhDs end up taking postdoc positions because that is what they are ‘supposed to do’ next. But instead of the postdoc leading to a professorship or some other faculty position, PhDs are getting stuck in the postdoc phase. The study referenced above found that 10% of all postdocs have been a postdoc for more than 6 years. And recently, Phys.org reported that this is a trend that has been going on for the past 50 years. From 1960 to 2010 the number of people who spent their ENTIRE academic career as a supporting scientist, rather than a lead scientist, rose from 25% to 60%. That means the majority of PhDs in academia are getting stuck in the support role and are unable to secure a faculty position as a lead scientist.

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