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Every week we scour the internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to. We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are here.

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To put it mildly, the road to a PhD can be rough. The Berkeley Science Review once reported that over half of grad school students claimed to feel “frequently overwhelmed, exhausted, sad, hopeless, or depressed.” And sadly, the American College Health Association has announced that 15% of college students were depressed. They added that suicide was a major issue within this demographic. Is it starting to look like academia has a problem? It should look that way — it’s true. Not to mention post—grad problems in finding careers. For all the value in a PhD’s education (and there is tremendous value here), PhDs are struggling. A lot of them are worried, and sometimes, these worries can seem too big to handle. But you can’t give up. Your talent is too valuable to be stifled. You will find your place in industry, and the first step is to think clearly about your prospects.

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This week on the Cheeky Scientist Radio Show we are joined by Jacqueline Whitmore – international etiquette expert to share her top etiquette tips for success in your industry transition. We are also joined by Anand Devasthanam, PhD, Medical Writer at Parexel. Anand will join us to talk about his career transition into his current position as a medical writer and give advice to others interested in this field.

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Every week we scour the internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to. We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are here.

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If you underestimate the power of networking, you’re going to make things really hard for yourself. Are you exclusively relying on applications and resumes? If you are, that’s called putting all your eggs in one basket. Don’t do that. Lou Adler, CEO of Performance-Based Hiring Learning Systems, reports that 85% of jobs are filled by networking. This isn’t surprising when you consider that networking is the only way to get referrals. According to Undercover Recruiter, only 7% of job applicants get referrals — but those who do get referrals account for 40% of those who get hired. By the time a lot of jobs are posted online, an internal referral process has already come up empty. This means that the job posting is likely to be a “Plan B” situation. The takeaway here is that – like it or not – networking is your best option for getting a PhD-level job.

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Every week we scour the internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to. We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are here.

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The Pew Research Center found that in nearly half of all two-parent families, both the mother and father work full-time. Within this same set of two-parent families, 26% consist of dads employed full-time and unemployed moms. Ready for the most revealing data? In a mere 2% of families, this is reversed: full-time moms and unemployed dads are 92% less common than the more traditional family models. The takeaway is that, statistically, women run a much higher risk than men when it comes to two-body compromise. Supporting this is research by Wolfinger et al, which found that a massive 89% of female academic faculty members have spouses in full-time employment. Only 56% of male faculty members can say the same. And, as reported by Rose Krieder and Jason Fields, women maintain a higher probability of being married in the first place (though only by a relatively small percentage). This gives sex and gender psychologists plenty to work with, but it doesn’t change the sheer challenge presented by the two-body problem. What can a couple do in the face of the two-body problem?

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Every week we scour the internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to. We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are here.

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This week on the Cheeky Scientist Radio Show we are joined by James Gould, PhD. James is the Director at the Office for Postdoctoral Fellows at Harvard Medical School and a sought-after presenter, speaker, and career consultant who is passionate about early career development for scientists.
James will talk about his experience with thousands of postdocs in their early careers and the biggest pitfalls he has seen – so you can avoid them.
We are also joined by Sarah Rodrigues, PhD, Customer Consultant in Europe for Elsevier. Sarah will join us to talk about her career transition taking her PhD in Hematology and Oncology and adding business development and consulting skills to attain her current position.

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It’s no surprise to anyone that data scientists dig through a lot of data. While working for a company, they might collect data from in-the-field sales personnel or key stakeholders, such as liaisons or application scientists. A data scientist position is very numbers-heavy, and it can be fairly writing-heavy too. This role will involve writing extensive written reports that take analyzed data and communicate it to other personnel. But data scientists are too few in number. McKinsey and Company predicted that going forward, data scientists will be in high demand, and that there is a serious shortage of analytical talent. Of course, any time there’s a shortage, supply and demand come into effect. For data scientists, high demand translates to a very high salary: according to Glassdoor, the U.S. national average is $117,000.

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