Skip to content

Are you submitting your resume to online job postings? You might be surprised to learn that your resume is never even seen by a human being. 98% of Fortune 500 companies use applicant tracking software, according to Jobscan. Large-size firms (those that employ more than 500 individuals) receive many thousands of resumes every week. The only way their hiring departments can be functional is by using tracking software to weed out unqualified candidates. This puts applicants in kind of a tough spot – optimize your resume to get through the tracking software or get used to rejection. Even highly qualified candidates face this very issue. Baruch College has reported that an unsettling 70% of all applications are never even seen by a person. It can be as simple as not having the right keywords – the software doesn’t see what it needs to see, and your application is automatically rejected. Here are a couple key items to remember during your job search. First, if you submit a resume and don’t hear back from an employer, it does not mean that you aren’t qualified. Second, you can bypass tracking software by getting one of the most powerful tools in networking – a referral. Regardless of how you apply to a job, your resume absolutely must be optimized for passage through software screening and meet industry’s standards.

Read More

Every week we scour the internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to. We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are here.

Read More

As in the case of Silvan Mueller, Business Development Manager of Bel Power Solutions & Protection, a background in STEM opens up a big door for PhDs. Even if they don’t realize it. After all, a huge concern of many PhDs is that they lack the business experience to enter into a business development role. But the business school of your university probably offers a series of courses aimed at business novices, so those can be a great resource. It’s possible your department would offer a tuition waiver for these, though you shouldn’t count on that. Some management departments even offer business development courses tailored to technical work in sectors like IT or biotechnology. Even if none of these are an option for you, Nature agrees that the right combination of technical and interpersonal skills makes business development a major opportunity for PhDs. If you’re still not certain, don;t forget that sometimes, PhDs enter a company in a technical role before transitioning to business development once they’ve acquired some industry knowledge.

Read More

Every week we scour the internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to. We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are here.

Read More

This week on the Cheeky Scientist Radio Show, we are joined by Peter Docker, co-author of Find Your Why with Simon Sinek. Peter will be sharing both why and how successful PhDs connect with a sense of purpose for career satisfaction and success. Also joining the show was Mariano Cardenas to talk about his role as an Application Scientist.

Read More

Even at the entry level, a career as a medical science liaison is very lucrative. It’s true that PhDs can expect excellent industry salaries, but medical science liaisons are special cases. Data from Payscale indicates that medical science liaisons with entry-level experience can expect an average base salary of $116K. This is a high-demand position, and it’s reflected in the pay. Additionally, the Bureau of Labor speculated that medical science positions in general are experiencing a faster-than-average growth rate of 8%. Other countries might have different titles for this position, like “medical associate” or something similar, but worldwide, it’s a very popular position for PhDs. Not to mention the networking opportunities — 98% of medical science liaisons stated that they manage relationships with key opinion leaders (KOLs) in the industry. This is a standard part of the job, and a KOL is definitely the kind of contact you want in your professional network.

Read More

This week on the Cheeky Scientist Radio Show we are joined by Jeff Kreisler. He’s editor-in-chief of PeopleScience, bestselling author, behavioral science advocate – and an overall funny guy. We are also joined by Addis Fuhr, PhD and Senior Modeling & Simulation Engineer/Analyst at MITRE. Addis will join us to talk about his career transition from an R&D Scientist into his current role.

Read More

Every week we scour the internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to. We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are here.

Read More

If you think that project managers aren’t crucial employees to have, think again – the Project Management Institute reports that 85% of firms have a project management office. If salary is any indication of importance, Glassdoor confirms an average pay of approximately $75,000 annually among project managers. Companies don’t just hand out money like that – project managers are valuable assets. There are a lot of different certification programs for project manager positions, but would you like to know a little secret? You don’t need one. It can certainly help, but if you’re a PhD, you don’t have to pay thousands of dollars for a certification – you already have the transferable skills required. That skill is R&D project management, and PhDs have been practicing it on a daily basis in their research, dating back through grad school. Anyone who’s worked in a university lab, or been a TA, has had to manage different academic projects. That means you know how it’s done, and you can take that knowledge with you into an industry career in project management.

Read More

Every week we scour the internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to. We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are here.

Read More

Application scientists help customers use and apply a company’s products. As ASBMB indicates, it’s very common to find job postings for application scientist positions that ask specifically for PhDs. And in most cases, application scientists will need to hold a doctoral degree. This is because they’re experts who draw from heavy science experience to use and teach others about complex products. Usually, science application happens in a STEM field like engineering or biotechnology. Science-based companies like Thermo-Fisher represent the sort of employer that needs PhDs who can interact directly with customers on their behalf. These customers won’t usually be laypeople – very often, they are actually PhDs, MDs, or other researchers. They might be people who use medical devices, computer systems, or other advanced technologies in their daily work. Put bluntly by David Freed, a medical doctor is not necessarily a scientist, so there is a powerful need for science experts to fill that gap. As an application scientist, your job will be to teach customers the proper application of your company’s products. However, you’ll also train sales support staff, who need to be informed sellers of the product lines. A sales team doesn’t necessarily have a background in STEM, but an application scientist does, and he or she will use that experience to educate the people around them.

Read More