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These 5 skills will qualify PhDs to get hired as clinical research associates

“Clinical research associate” ranks #84 on CNN Money’s list of the 100 “Best Jobs in America,” and with a median pay of $76k, you can begin to see why. In fact, according to a U.K. government report, industry workers in the life sciences earn more than the average income of those employed in any other economic sector. Despite this, you shouldn’t chalk up the amazing benefits of this career to mere income… From life-saving medical apparatuses to carefully refined treatments for lifelong debilitations, clinical research associates have a powerful connection to innovations in medicine. You’d have a tough time naming a career with greater impact and importance than this one. Clinical trials work puts PhDs at the forefront of modern medicine and its powerful applications – scientific advancements that change–and save–lives. Obviously, most PhDs have scientific expertise. They have mastered the crucial talents of data analysis and documentation, and this is exactly why employers tend to prefer PhD graduates as they go on the hunt for clinical research candidates.

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Every week, we scour the Internet for the best industry transition articles for PhDs – so you don’t have to! Our two consultants independently search for the most informative articles in the categories of networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each…

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Did you know that, according to Robert Half, 70% of hiring managers don’t expect job candidates to take the first salary offer? Instead, they expect you to negotiate. Employers are competing over talented candidates just like you, which means you have plenty of leverage for negotiating. That being said, it’s normal to feel anxious. It takes courage to speak up for yourself and ask for something better than what you’ve been offered.But there is no such thing as a professional salary negotiator.You can’t hire someone to waltz into the corporate office and advocate for a better salary on your behalf.If you want a higher salary, it’s up to you to make your voice heard at the appropriate time – after the job offer, and before agreeing to anything official.Sure, the salary you are offered in industry is going to be much higher than what you were making in academia.But this doesn’t mean it’s as high as it should be.Many companies want to pay you as little as possible.A company is always focused on the bottom line – every dollar spent is an investment.55% of job candidates are negotiating their salary, and you should be as well.The math behind this checks out: If you don’t negotiate, you can end up losing out on hundreds of thousands of dollars over the course of your career.

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Every week, we scour the Internet for the best industry transition articles for PhDs – so you don’t have to! Our two consultants independently search for the most informative articles in the categories of networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each…

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 Author and PhD Coyte Cooper joins us to share his own wild transition out of academia. He explains how other PhDs can see rejection as an opportunity and use it to their advantage. Then PhD Yaping Moshier, sMBA, discusses how PhDs can work toward their own industry career in regulatory affairs.   What happens…

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 Author Nir Eyal joins us to share his research on the psychology of attention, self-control, and time management. Technology distracts, but it’s not the root cause… Then PhD Irene Mencia Castrano describes her transition out of academia and into her current role as a senior innovation consultant.   Are you struggling to manage the…

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Every week, we scour the Internet for the best industry transition articles for PhDs – so you don’t have to! Our two consultants independently search for the most informative articles in the categories of networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each…

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An interview with Joydeep Pal, PhD 1. What is your name, your full job title, and the name of the company you work for? Joydeep Pal, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Foodinjoy Ltd, UK 2. What is your favorite part about working in industry? I am responsible for both the commercial and technical aspects of…

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Every week we scour the internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to. We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are here.

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Are you a PhD with your heart set on becoming a CEO? Pause for a moment and recognize how rare you are. The majority of PhDs will never cross the gap between working for other people and working for themselves. Entrepreneurship in general is rare, but becoming an entrepreneur after completing a PhD is exceptional. Study EU examined the largest companies on each continent, and they reported that among these companies’ CEOs, a mere 10% can boast a doctoral degree. But the question is this: Why don’t more PhDs go this route? After all, as a PhD, you have a substantial business advantage: You know how to learn. You worked awfully hard to develop your PhD skill set – as just a few examples, you know how to: Gather evidence and collect data through rigorous research and experimentation Respond to experimental feedback Identify trends and outliers Optimize and innovate systems Manage multiple projects at the same time All of these items are core ingredients of a good entrepreneurial strategy. PhDs know how to navigate uncertainty, even if it means fumbling around in the dark, blindly looking for clues. Hypothesize, design, test, fail and iterate – it works in science, and it works in business too. Going from PhD to entrepreneur is a natural transition, but there’s one other thing to mention. A study by Kerr et al. identified “locus of control” (LOC) as a key trait in entrepreneurship literature – your locus of control can be internal or external. Entrepreneurs benefit vastly from having an internal locus of control because it means they conceptualize that their own decisions control their lives. In other words, they source control inside themselves – not in random external forces. Just by obtaining their degree, a PhD has drawn from an internal LOC to show initiative and move forward in a self-empowered fashion. The final mental shift for PhDs is to move from valuing knowledge for its own sake to valuing the translation of knowledge into a product or service that improves other people’s lives and drives a profit.

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Some PhDs haven’t heard about–or even considered–the medical writing career path. But in spite of our different backgrounds, a lot of PhDs can become qualified to dive into medical writer roles. As the job title indicates, written communication skills are very important for this position. Medical writing is essentially an umbrella term that covers everything from writing about medicine to editing, translating, and project management. And industry needs professionals to fill this role – the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates that by 2026, specialized writing roles of this kind are expected to grow 11% from 2016.

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