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The main reason you should be looking for an industry job instead of staying in academia is simple: There are too many academic research scientists. Nature reported that in recent years, the number of academic research scientists jumped by 150% in the U.S. alone. Meanwhile, the number of tenured and other full-time faculty positions has plateaued and, in many places, even declined. Around 10% of all postdocs had been going on for more than 6 years. Imagine doing a postdoc for 6 or more years. A lot of PhDs don’t have to imagine that scenario – they are living it. Academia doesn’t value its researchers because there are too many of them. Yet in industry, there are not enough. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, industry employment for biotechnology and biopharmaceutical scientists was projected to grow 13% over the last decade. Society has become increasingly reliant on technology and pharmaceuticals. They are also becoming more affluent, allowing for more spending on medicine. As a result, industry employers need PhD-level research scientists. The problem is that few PhDs know how to get hired into industry R&D positions, and even fewer know what life will be like once they’re hired. I had both of these problems until I joined the Cheeky Scientist Association. The Association taught me what I needed to know to get hired, and has continued to support me in my industry career.

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Every week, we scour the Internet for the best industry transition articles for PhDs – so you don’t have to! Our two consultants independently search for the most informative articles in the categories of networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each…

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An interview with Nicole Bowens, PhD, Medical Writer, Arbor Scientia   What is your favorite part about working in industry? What I most enjoy about industry versus academia is having clear objectives and deadlines. As a medical writer in promotional medical education, I most enjoy being able to use creativity in the design and presentation…

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 Author Darren Gold joins us to share how you can figure out your own psychological “code” and optimize it to move your career forward. Understanding your own subconscious is the key. Then industry PhD Sherri Ter Molen brings listeners important tips for getting a job as a communication associate.   Do you actually know…

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Medical Science Liaison (MSL) roles are growing fast. These roles are actually one of the top 10 industry careers for PhDs right now. How do you like the thought of jet-setting across the country in your tailored suit, discussing science with high-level thought leaders, and earning a great salary? Does that sound like a nice change from working in a lab for peanuts? It did to me, that’s for sure. In 2019, the median salary of MSLs was more than $122,000. But the MSL position isn’t right for everyone. MSLs undertake cutting-edge, scientific discussions on drug therapy and disease states. They do this with leading healthcare providers in both academic and community-based settings. Transitioning into an MSL position requires strategic thinking and the ability to ensure individual needs are met while staying aligned with the overall objectives of the company. There has to be a strong match between your personality and values, and the culture and values of the company for which you end up working. You need to understand yourself and what you want as well as how other people see you. Medical science liaising is an inherently social practice. It demands a personable, outgoing attitude; good communication; and excellent teaching skills. Some people are simply better suited to solitary work. But as a PhD, for the longest time, I tried to fit myself into a box: the independent scientist, alone at the bench with a microscope, laptop, coffee, and copious notes. Yet I loved to present my research in front of others, to mingle at conferences… I wanted to talk science with anyone who was willing to join me. If this sounds familiar, you might be a perfect fit for the MSL role.

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Every week, we scour the Internet for the best industry transition articles for PhDs – so you don’t have to! Our two consultants independently search for the most informative articles in the categories of networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each…

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 Author Whitney Johnson joins us to share her disruptive job-search strategy for PhDs who want to transition into industry. You’ll learn how to model your own transition after market disruptions. Then industry PhD Robert Hable will share tips on working toward a career in leadership development.   Market disruption is a powerful phenomenon…  …

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There is no denying the fact that cover letters are becoming less and less popular. According to a survey in Jobvite, 55% of hiring managers say that while cover letters are not important in their job search process, they still recommend that you learn how to nail them. With the advent of social media, recruiters and hiring managers can easily vet a candidate on LinkedIn without even looking at their resume. But here’s the thing… You never know exactly what the hiring manager wants to see, and it can be a huge misstep if you forget this. In a recent survey of 1,500 recruiters and hiring managers by CareerBuilder, 29% of employers said they wanted a cover letter. That is significant enough to include it. In that same survey, 77% of employers indicated that they are most interested in knowing if the job candidate’s skills match what they are looking for. Your cover letter should convince employers of precisely this – it is 1 more opportunity to prove your worth. Use this opportunity to show the hiring manager that you have what it takes to do the job, and that you take the hiring process seriously.

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Every week, we scour the Internet for the best industry transition articles for PhDs – so you don’t have to! Our two consultants independently search for the most informative articles in the categories of networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each…

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Many PhDs spend countless hours on their resume, listing endless accomplishments, responsibilities, publications, presentations, and other information that practically bore industry employers to death. They mass-upload this ridiculous document to online job postings and wait for the job offers to roll in like red carpet on their way to industry success. These PhDs–otherwise sharp and creative people–are shocked when they never hear anything back. The reality is that your resume is probably never even seen by another human being, let alone rejected. Your resume is being rejected by a computer program. JobScan reports that more than 90% of Fortune 500 companies are using Applicant Tracking Software (ATS) to screen candidates’ resumes. And according to The Financial Post, ATS systems reject up to 80% of resumes in a matter of seconds. By now, you have probably begun to realize why your non-tailored, academic-style resume is not getting any response. That being said, even the best resume could be rejected by ATS. To be clear, a great resume, tailored to a specific job and written in an industry format, can still end up getting rejected by ATS. Unfortunately, you cannot say for certain what an employer has told their ATS to look for in a resume. This is why your resume is not actually the most important part of your job search. Even a perfect resume is not enough to get you a job. You need to network and generate referrals so that you can send your resume directly to a person. Only once you have a connection to the company you are interested in does your resume become important. As reported by Quartz, candidates with a referral have a 40% better chance of getting hired. Yet even with a referral, a terrible resume will lead to a rejection.

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An interview with Marios Tsatsos, PhD 1. What is your name, your full job title, and the name of the company you work for? Marios Tsatsos, Data Scientist working for Clarivate Analytics (Web of Science Group). 2. What is your favorite part about working in industry? The impact-oriented objectives and connectivity that such a position…

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Every week, we scour the Internet for the best industry transition articles for PhDs – so you don’t have to! Our two consultants independently search for the most informative articles in the categories of networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each…

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