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Industry Positions

PhDs Are Entrepreneurs – 3 Ways To Start A Business And Quit Denying Your Leadership Skills

Are you a PhD with your heart set on becoming a CEO? Pause for a moment and recognize how rare you are. The majority of PhDs will never cross the gap between working for other people and working for themselves. Entrepreneurship in general is rare, but becoming an entrepreneur after completing a PhD is exceptional. Study EU examined the largest companies on each continent, and they reported that among these companies’ CEOs, a mere 10% can boast a doctoral degree. But the question is this: Why don’t more PhDs go this route? After all, as a PhD, you have a substantial business advantage: You know how to learn. You worked awfully hard to develop your PhD skill set – as just a few examples, you know how to: Gather evidence and collect data through rigorous research and experimentation Respond to experimental feedback Identify trends and outliers Optimize and innovate systems Manage multiple projects at the same time All of these items are core ingredients of a good entrepreneurial strategy. PhDs know how to navigate uncertainty, even if it means fumbling around in the dark, blindly looking for clues. Hypothesize, design, test, fail and iterate – it works in science, and it works in business too. Going from PhD to entrepreneur is a natural transition, but there’s one other thing to mention. A study by Kerr et al. identified “locus of control” (LOC) as a key trait in entrepreneurship literature – your locus of control can be internal or external. Entrepreneurs benefit vastly from having an internal locus of control because it means they conceptualize that their own decisions control their lives. In other words, they source control inside themselves – not in random external forces. Just by obtaining their degree, a PhD has drawn from an internal LOC to show initiative and move forward in a self-empowered fashion. The final mental shift for PhDs is to move from valuing knowledge for its own sake to valuing the translation of knowledge into a product or service that improves other people’s lives and drives a profit.

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Forget About Being A Medical Writer If You Have A PhD But Lack These Skills

Some PhDs haven’t heard about–or even considered–the medical writing career path. But in spite of our different backgrounds, a lot of PhDs can become qualified to dive into medical writer roles. As the job title indicates, written communication skills are very important for this position. Medical writing is essentially an umbrella term that covers everything from writing about medicine to editing, translating, and project management. And industry needs professionals to fill this role – the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates that by 2026, specialized writing roles of this kind are expected to grow 11% from 2016.

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5 Ways Your PhD Skills Can Turn You Into A Business Development Professional

As in the case of Silvan Mueller, Business Development Manager of Bel Power Solutions & Protection, a background in STEM opens up a big door for PhDs. Even if they don’t realize it. After all, a huge concern of many PhDs is that they lack the business experience to enter into a business development role. But the business school of your university probably offers a series of courses aimed at business novices, so those can be a great resource. It’s possible your department would offer a tuition waiver for these, though you shouldn’t count on that. Some management departments even offer business development courses tailored to technical work in sectors like IT or biotechnology. Even if none of these are an option for you, Nature agrees that the right combination of technical and interpersonal skills makes business development a major opportunity for PhDs. If you’re still not certain, don;t forget that sometimes, PhDs enter a company in a technical role before transitioning to business development once they’ve acquired some industry knowledge.

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PhDs Have to Know These 5 Facts About Medical Science Liaisons

Even at the entry level, a career as a medical science liaison is very lucrative. It’s true that PhDs can expect excellent industry salaries, but medical science liaisons are special cases. Data from Payscale indicates that medical science liaisons with entry-level experience can expect an average base salary of $116K. This is a high-demand position, and it’s reflected in the pay. Additionally, the Bureau of Labor speculated that medical science positions in general are experiencing a faster-than-average growth rate of 8%. Other countries might have different titles for this position, like “medical associate” or something similar, but worldwide, it’s a very popular position for PhDs. Not to mention the networking opportunities — 98% of medical science liaisons stated that they manage relationships with key opinion leaders (KOLs) in the industry. This is a standard part of the job, and a KOL is definitely the kind of contact you want in your professional network.

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3 Things PhDs Must Know To Become R&D Project Managers

If you think that project managers aren’t crucial employees to have, think again – the Project Management Institute reports that 85% of firms have a project management office. If salary is any indication of importance, Glassdoor confirms an average pay of approximately $75,000 annually among project managers. Companies don’t just hand out money like that – project managers are valuable assets. There are a lot of different certification programs for project manager positions, but would you like to know a little secret? You don’t need one. It can certainly help, but if you’re a PhD, you don’t have to pay thousands of dollars for a certification – you already have the transferable skills required. That skill is R&D project management, and PhDs have been practicing it on a daily basis in their research, dating back through grad school. Anyone who’s worked in a university lab, or been a TA, has had to manage different academic projects. That means you know how it’s done, and you can take that knowledge with you into an industry career in project management.

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What Is An Application Scientist & How To Become One

Application scientists help customers use and apply a company’s products. As ASBMB indicates, it’s very common to find job postings for application scientist positions that ask specifically for PhDs. And in most cases, application scientists will need to hold a doctoral degree. This is because they’re experts who draw from heavy science experience to use and teach others about complex products. Usually, science application happens in a STEM field like engineering or biotechnology. Science-based companies like Thermo-Fisher represent the sort of employer that needs PhDs who can interact directly with customers on their behalf. These customers won’t usually be laypeople – very often, they are actually PhDs, MDs, or other researchers. They might be people who use medical devices, computer systems, or other advanced technologies in their daily work. Put bluntly by David Freed, a medical doctor is not necessarily a scientist, so there is a powerful need for science experts to fill that gap. As an application scientist, your job will be to teach customers the proper application of your company’s products. However, you’ll also train sales support staff, who need to be informed sellers of the product lines. A sales team doesn’t necessarily have a background in STEM, but an application scientist does, and he or she will use that experience to educate the people around them.

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5 Mistakes That Prevent PhDs from Getting Hired and How to Fix Them

PhD hiring in industry is up by 500%. You read that right. A recent MassBio report shows that science PhD job listings were sitting at 27,700 in Massachusetts alone. That’s the second-highest number on record, and only by 3%. If you were wondering, Massachusetts is home to 3 of the most PhD-populated cities worldwide. The American Institute of Physics displays a long list of employers who have already hired PhD-holding employees between 2009 and 2016. So why are some PhDs struggling so hard to get industry jobs? They’re going about it the wrong way. Your PhD is an asset, not an excuse. It’s only a waste if you allow it to be, so treat it like what it is: a huge advantage.

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5 Exciting Career Paths In Industry For Humanities PhDs

Humanities PhDs have no reason to believe that they lack exciting career opportunities in the future. A PhD is a doctorate in knowledge. As a PhD, you create new knowledge that did not exist before. While creating new knowledge, you gain critical transferable skills that you can leverage to build a career outside your own area of expertise. An excellent humanities education prepares an individual in creative and critical-thinking, and persuasion in areas outside of technology.

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5 Science Communication Careers For PhDs Who Enjoy Talking And Writing About Science

All of the major tech, biopharma, or medical companies need science communicators. All of the major news outlets need science communicators. All museums and education institutions need science communicators. There are many ways that you can use your STEM PhD and your passion for writing in an industry career. Here are 5 science communication careers for PhDs who enjoy talking and writing about science.

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15 Industry Positions STEM PhDs Are Being Hired Into Right Now

The biotech and biopharma industry is growing rapidly. ContractPharma reported that the biotechnology market was valued at $330 billion in 2015 and is expected to more than double by 2024 to $775 billion. With that incredibly rapid growth comes massive and fast change. New technologies and innovations create an atmosphere of constant change and industry needs employees who can thrive under these conditions. They need leaders.They need PhDs. According to a study published in PLOS One, a few of the most valuable transferable skills that PhDs have are the ability to gather and interpret information and the ability to learn quickly. As a PhD you can learn and interpret data better and faster than almost anyone else. It is one of your most valuable skills. And it is a skill that can be applied to all industry positions. So whatever type of position you are interested in your fast learning will be an asset that employers want.

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