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Best Industry Transition Articles Of The Week For PhDs (November 19th, 2017)

Every week we scour the internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to. We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are here.

How To Know If A Medical Science Liaison (MSL) Job Is Right For You

Medical Science Liaison, or MSL, positions are increasingly popular among PhDs for a reason. According to the U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics, medical professions such as MSL roles are among the fastest growing industries between 2012 and 2022.These roles are also expected to be paid very well.
Payscale estimates that MSLs will continue to earn a median salary of over $100,000 USD a year. The best news is that top companies currently hiring MSLs favor hiring PhDs over PharmDs (30.9% and 30.1%, respectively). The key to transitioning into your first MSL role will be networking and aligning your transferable skills with this special career choice. Here are 5 other things PhDs must do to transition into an MSL position.

Industry Transition Spotlight: Morgan Bye, PhD

In this interview with Morgan H. Bye, PhD, he talks about how his position in industry has an almost immediate and tangible impact on patients, something that he only saw happening in the very distant future during his academic career. He reminds PhDs that they are valuable, and that no matter what their academic careers looks like there is a position in industry where they can thrive.

5 Ways To Find The Name Of The Person To Address Your Cover Letter To

Job postings usually do not include the name of the person who you should address your cover letter to. And, you may be tempted to address your cover letter, “To Whom It May Concern”. Doing this will set you up to fail. Take the initiative to find out whose name you should put on your cover letter. Always call the company first if you are not sure who to address the cover letter to. Then, if that doesn’t work, you can try other tactics such as networking, reading the job posting more thoroughly, finding out who your supervisor would be, and searching online. When you do find out who you should address your cover letter to, you will present as a much stronger candidate and will be more likely to succeed in getting an interview.

Best Industry Transition Articles Of The Week For PhDs (November 12th, 2017)

Every week we scour the internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to. We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, interviews, transferable skills, academic blues, industry positions, and business acumen. Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are here.

Giuseppe Allegretta, Ph.D.

My main problem before joining the Association was being able to show my resume to employers. I couldn’t get it into the hands of anyone. I didn’t know how to tailor my resume either. I was really excited once I joined as I was getting in touch with many people from around the globe. I was learning how to apply to positions in different countries. The group was very diverse! I quickly learned how to improve my LinkedIn profile and my resume. I found networking  in the private group very useful and in particular I learned how to network with different people in different countries. I got my job by responding to a job offer with my new resume and got a call back the next day. The private group helped me optimize specific things like the summary to my LinkedIn profile. I met many people who got jobs and their transition stories gave me confidence that I could get a job and showed me how. I tell everyone about the Association by saying it’s a very useful group by helping you understand how to improve your resume and your network. It’s very helpful. In my experience it really helps you psychologically as well.

Before joining I had no idea how to look for jobs in the United States as I’m from India and am a PhD student. I joined well before finishing my PhD because I knew I would be at a huge advantage in terms of looking for jobs and gaining the skills to land a position before I became desperate. Once I joined, the LinkedIn materials were incredible and I went through the material at my own pace in 2.5 months. At first I was worried because I wasn’t sure there were other people like me (chemical engineers) in the group. Through the member directory and the private group, I was able to find many other engineers and I soon realised that it was even more valuable to network with others outside my own background. Now I have a job lined up before even graduating. The organization is amazing. You can network with members and go through the trainings step-by-step and have everything you need. With over 4,000 members now it’s an incredible resource.

Unlike many of the Associates, I had worked in industry before. I worked at Intel first but after 3 years on the job I wanted something different. The challenge I had was marketing my transferable skills. I was skeptical at first about the Association because the name sounded like a scam to me but after reading about Isaiah’s personal experience, I was motivated to join. Since then it has been a mind blowing experience. The modules covering the resume topics were awesome – I had a good resume but there were very important concepts I hadn’t learned. The same with interviewing, concepts such as the STAR technique, were foreign to me. Learning about my transferable skills really helped me market myself to another industry. The Association taught me I do have transferable skills. The entire Salary Negotiation webinar was also very valuable. It’s a wonderful resource to help PhDs transition from academia into industry. It works 100% and is genuine.

Networking is very difficult in my country (Brazil). To network professionally you must be very, very professional. Before joining the Association, I wasn’t sure how to do this. The Association helped me visualize my end point and decide on the job that I actually wanted, which helped me start acting professional and start networking professionally. Figuring out what I wanted to do was the hardest part. I also needed help with the strategy of getting a job. I learned how to approach other industry professionals too. I just started my job as a Medical Science Liaison and during the onboarding process they are training us about industry and everything they are training us on I already learned in the CSA modules and webinars! It’s a program that changes your mindset from a limited academic mindset to a new, very open industry mindset. It’s a group of people that help you make a huge transformation both professionally and personally.

I was sending out resumes but not hearing anything back. There weren’t a lot of career fairs or career resources for chemical engineers. Things got worse when I got my PhD and when I did postdoc – it was like companies who came to the University were not interested. At that point, I decided to join the Association. My first reaction was: Holy! There is a lot of information! I quickly got organized and dug in. The private group is amazing – it brought all these people going through the same thing together. I realized I was not alone. It was very helpful. I had all of the credentials and was like why don’t companies see this but then I realized everyone had similar thoughts and sentiments and I learned how to do it with the transition stories as guidance and encouragement. The Association is a collection of PhDs who are looking to break into industry and be something more than an underpaid researcher. The group is a support system. It’s not like joining CSA is automatically going to get a job. Joining will get you access to a library but you still have to read the books.