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Best Industry Transition Articles Of The Week For PhDs (May 21st, 2017)

Every week we scour the internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to. We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, transferable skills, interviews, academic blues, and industry positions. Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are here.

The Best Job Opportunities In Europe For Life Science PhDs

As more European nations strive to emulate the growing interest in life sciences and biopharma industry, government initiatives are rising to meet the need. The bioscience sector in Europe looks promising, with more predicted growth and job opportunities forecasted. If you are a PhD planning to work in the industry, it would be worthwhile to identify and target these clusters as they offer multiple opportunities in one location. Here are the top six life science industry cluster areas to get you started.

Understanding Economics For A Successful Career Path

For PhDs transitioning into industry, proving that you have an understanding of the economics that impact business shows that you understand the very basics of how business works. Using your experience in academia and how you managed economics there provides a foundation for transferable skills for industry. Understanding the economic hierarchy of an organization will take PhDs intending to transition, or already in industry, a long way in their careers moving forward.

Best Industry Transition Articles Of The Week For PhDs (May 14th, 2017)

Every week we scour the internet to find the best industry transition articles for PhDs, so you don’t have to. We have two consultants independently search for the most informative articles on networking, CVs/resumes, transferable skills, interviews, academic blues, and industry positions. Our consultants vote on a top article for each category and for a top overall article each week. This week’s best articles are here.

Careers In Environmental Science (Industry Careers For PhDs Podcast)

Are you a non-STEM PhD and curious about careers outside of academia? Have you thought about working as a consultant but are unsure what it’s all about? In this episode of the Industry Careers for PhDs podcast, we interview Dr. Edvard Glücksman, a chartered scientist and consultant at Wardell Armstrong where he specializes in environmental and social impact assessment. He also works with the integration of ecosystem services within impact assessments and applied policy around biodiversity. Edvard teaches us about the world of consulting and how to transition into this role. In this podcast, you’ll learn: What is a day-in-the-life…

Christopher Drummond, PhD
Christopher Drummond, Ph.D.

I was feeling a lot of guilt about leaving academia but it was a relief to finally let go and transition into industry. Before joining the CSA, I knew I was good at writing grants and publishing papers but I could not see what other value I could add to a company. I didn’t know what I wanted from a career or what skills I could bring to the table. All the CSA webinars on different career paths were instrumental for me. Not only did it help me figure out what I wanted to do but it helped me get interviews. The CSA also helped me to drastically change my resume, after which I started getting contacted by recruiters and hiring managers. By far the most helpful part of the program was the private group. The instant feedback was invaluable. As a PhD, I think too much about every decision. The private group helped me to stop over-think and be confident because I was given assistance from people who have gone through it all before.

 

Neelakantan Vasudevan, PhD
Neelakantan T. Vasudevan, Ph.D.

I wanted to leave academia but industry was a black box to me. I had no idea what kinds of jobs to look for, who to talk to or how to approach a resume. I was lost! After joining the CSA, my number of connections on LinkedIn grew to +500. I received a lot of personal help in the private group for preparing my resume and preparing interview presentations. When I went for my industry interview, not only did they offer me the position, but they offered me a better position than the one I originally applied for. I became a Senior Scientist and received an excellent benefits package. Everything the Association said helped me during my transition and I cannot recommend them enough to other academics who wish to do the same.

 

I didn’t have any contacts in the U.S. and no experience in the country either. My work experience was from South Korea so employers didn’t have confidence. Joining the Association was one of the best decisions I ever made in my life until now. My problem is I was begging for jobs – I didn’t know my worth. The Association taught me to know my value. The best part of joining was being surrounded by talented and supportive PhDs. I really like that people are open about their vulnerabilities. One more thing, I took a 3 year break after having my kids. I didn’t think I would get a job after that but I needed to take care of my family. The Association saved me in this area. Again, joining was the best decisions I ever made. Life is a relief now.

Ravikiran Ravulapalli, PhD
Ravikiran Ravulapalli, Ph.D.

Before joining CSA, I tried to network with friends and family. I think I lost a few good contacts/positions because of my underprepared resume and poor networking messages. But after joining CSA, I was exposed to how I can build the network over time and how I can tailor my message based on their response. Networking really works and the lessons you learn through the CSA will cover you for life. The time it takes for someone to transition will vary. For me, it took one year, for some Associates, it takes less than three months. But you cannot be too harsh on yourself. The CSA is always there to support you and help you to refine your approach. The key is to trust the process and not to rush. Now, I am very happy where I am. This is the company I dreamed of working for and my boss is fantastic.

 

Before joining the CSA, my job hunt was going no where. I would send resumes (the exact same one) and hear no response. Recruiters would ask about my visa status and insist that few companies would be willing to sponsor me. I was a postdoc for 4 years and thought I would be a postdoc forever. My spirits were low, I felt despondent and dejected. I thought I was stuck in academia even though I knew, personally, it was not where I belonged. I was very apprehensive to join the Association because I didn’t believe the private group could be of benefit to me. I attended the free public webinar on LinkedIn and learned immediately how my profile was preventing me from getting noticed by hiring managers.  That’s when I knew it would be valuable to join. Once I joined the CSA, I went through the material in 3.5 weeks and it was directly responsible for me obtaining my job. The resume materials were very, very helpful and I learned how to create a targeted, industry savvy document.