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Did you know that, according to Robert Half, 70% of hiring managers don’t expect job candidates to take the first salary offer? Instead, they expect you to negotiate. Employers are competing over talented candidates just like you, which means you have plenty of leverage for negotiating. That being said, it’s normal to feel anxious. It takes courage to speak up for yourself and ask for something better than what you’ve been offered.But there is no such thing as a professional salary negotiator.You can’t hire someone to waltz into the corporate office and advocate for a better salary on your behalf.If you want a higher salary, it’s up to you to make your voice heard at the appropriate time – after the job offer, and before agreeing to anything official.Sure, the salary you are offered in industry is going to be much higher than what you were making in academia.But this doesn’t mean it’s as high as it should be.Many companies want to pay you as little as possible.A company is always focused on the bottom line – every dollar spent is an investment.55% of job candidates are negotiating their salary, and you should be as well.The math behind this checks out: If you don’t negotiate, you can end up losing out on hundreds of thousands of dollars over the course of your career.

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What do PhDs have to lose by avoiding salary negotiations? To be blunt, and even a little obvious, the answer is money. Lots of it. According to a survey by Jobvite, 84% of negotiators enjoyed higher pay than the baseline offers they were given when they accepted the job. What’s more, only 29% negotiated at all. But consider that about a fifth of those who negotiated received 11-15% higher pay than the baseline offers. So if it’s not clear by now, negotiations are a pretty big deal, and this sentiment is firmly backed by statistics. For those who don’t negotiate, another survey by Payscale found 28% gave “I’m uncomfortable negotiating salary” as a reason to not negotiate, and 19% said the didn’t want to be perceived as “pushy”. Considering how hard you have worked to earn your PhD, should you lose out on significant sums of money because you feel uncomfortable? Absolutely not.

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Many companies want to pay you as little as possible.This doesn’t mean they don’t value you, but a company is always focused on the bottom line and every dollar spent is an investment. According to a report by Robert Half, 70% of hiring managers do not expect the job candidate to take the first salary offer. They expect you to negotiate. So that means they are offering you less than what is possible. The same survey found that 55% of candidates are negotiating their salary. Are you? The market is currently a candidate driven market, meaning that according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics the unemployment rate continues to fall, currently at just 3.7% and talent is in short supply. Employers are competing over the talent employees (you!) which means that you have leverage when negotiating. You just need to move past the thoughts that you are not worth a higher salary and negotiate.

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When you don’t ask for a higher salary and employer will know that you are inexperienced and they will know that you don’t really know your value. A report by CareerBuilder shows that 52% of employers stated that the first salary offer they give candidates is lower than what they are willing to pay. They are trying to get you to work for them for the least price possible, but remember you are valuable. Don’t accept the first offer.Negotiation is brand new for most PhDs. But, remember, there was a time that research was brand new to you, and now you are an expert. The only way to get better is to practice and to jump in!

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Employers expect you to negotiate your salary. This is a normal part of a job offer and if you don’t negotiate you are losing out on earning thousands of dollars more every year. CareerBuilder reported that 52% of employers stated that the first offer they give candidates is a lower salary than they are willing to pay. They are leaving room for you to negotiate. But, if you just accept the low salary they initially offer you, you will never know what they actually would have been willing to pay you. Plus, your fears of the employer turning down your request are actually misplaced. The majority of those who ask for a salary increase are given the increase.According to Jobvite, 68% of employers increased the starting salary for those candidates who asked. However, you have to make the ask and you have to do it the right way.

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Negotiations are the final – and often the toughest – part of the job search process. You want to earn a salary that makes you feel valued and the company want to stay within their budget. Because negotiating creates what many see as a stressful situation, most people don’t even try to negotiate their salary. A survey by Robert Half, found that 61% of people do not negotiate their salary. That means that the majority of people are missing out on thousands of extra dollars they could be earning by simply asking a question. Don’t be one of those people. The fear you have about negotiating is unfounded. According to the National Society Of Collegiate Scholars, 80% of those who negotiated their salary were successful and 74% of hiring managers reported that they have room to increase the starting salary by 5-10% during negotiations. So, most companies are automatically offering you 5-10% less money than what is possible. That is money that you will just be leaving behind if you don’t negotiate.

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Many, many PhDs are scared to negotiate. Or, they just don’t know how to negotiate, so they don’t do it. CNBC reported that only 29% of job seekers negotiated the salary for their current position. This is a terrible mistake. All of these people who are not negotiating are losing out on substantial salary increases they could be gaining. For example, on average when someone did negotiate their salary, they gained a 13.3% increase in salary. That means that if you get an initial offer of $75,000 and you gain a 13.3% increase, you will earn an extra $10,000 per year!

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Negotiating increases starting salary by an average of 13.3% (Glassdoor). That means if your initial offer was $80,000, simply engaging in a basic negotiation could raise your salary to above $90,000. All you have to say is, “Thank you so much for the offer. I am so excited to join the company. But, I was hoping for a high salary. What’s possible?” That simple sentence can earn you $10,000. But, the majority of people don’t negotiate. Only 46% of men and 34% of women negotiate their salary (Robert Half). The vast majority of people are completely missing out on the incredible salary bump that negotiation can bring.

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If you fail to negotiate, you will lose out on thousands of dollars. On average, not negotiating will result in you missing out on $7,528, or a 13.3% increase in your stating salary (Glassdoor). Over time, missing out on this initial salary increase will cost you hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of dollars. An economist from Carnegie Mellon University told NPR that when graduate students don’t negotiate their initial salary, they are missing out on $1 million to $1.5 million dollars over the course of their career. Asking a simple question could earn you more than a million dollars! So, why don’t people do it? Only 39% of people negotiate their salary. The majority of people do not negotiate — whether it’s because they are scared or don’t know how, these people are missing out big time (CNBC). Negotiating is just a skill you need to learn and then practice.

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Negotiating an industry job offer with a professional recruiter requires skill and confidence. The stages of negotiation can seem daunting when you’re desperate to transition out of academia. But the biggest mistake you can make is simply settling and accepting the first, or any, offer you receive without negotiating. Negotiation is expected as part of the process. Failing to negotiate your industry job offer will have both short and long-term financial consequences. These 3 stages of negotiation with recruiters will help you ensure the best possible starting package to build from as you transition into your industry job.

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Whether or not you understand how negotiating works, it is being used against you.

This is especially true when you’re applying for an industry job, interviewing, or vying for a promotion. The problem is that most people, especially PhDs, don’t know how to negotiate salary. These people don’t understand how negotiation works or why it’s important so they refuse to do it. The problem is that refusing to negotiate can severely limit your career success. Being willing to negotiate, on the other hand, can push your career forward. This is, in part, because your starting salary and career trajectory are tightly linked. Here are 12 tips to help you negotiate a higher salary contract.

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Everyone is negotiating for something. Whether or not you understand how negotiating works, it is being used against you. This is especially true when you’re applying for a job, interviewing, or trying to get a promotion. The problem is that most people, especially PhDs, don’t know how to negotiate salary. There are, however, a few savvy PhDs who take the time to learn about negotiating and are happier (and richer) for it. Here are 10 tips to help you negotiate salary contracts higher.

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