Skip to content

Are you submitting your resume to online job postings? You might be surprised to learn that your resume is never even seen by a human being. 98% of Fortune 500 companies use applicant tracking software, according to Jobscan. Large-size firms (those that employ more than 500 individuals) receive many thousands of resumes every week. The only way their hiring departments can be functional is by using tracking software to weed out unqualified candidates. This puts applicants in kind of a tough spot – optimize your resume to get through the tracking software or get used to rejection. Even highly qualified candidates face this very issue. Baruch College has reported that an unsettling 70% of all applications are never even seen by a person. It can be as simple as not having the right keywords – the software doesn’t see what it needs to see, and your application is automatically rejected. Here are a couple key items to remember during your job search. First, if you submit a resume and don’t hear back from an employer, it does not mean that you aren’t qualified. Second, you can bypass tracking software by getting one of the most powerful tools in networking – a referral. Regardless of how you apply to a job, your resume absolutely must be optimized for passage through software screening and meet industry’s standards.

Read More

If you underestimate the power of networking, you’re going to make things really hard for yourself. Are you exclusively relying on applications and resumes? If you are, that’s called putting all your eggs in one basket. Don’t do that. Lou Adler, CEO of Performance-Based Hiring Learning Systems, reports that 85% of jobs are filled by networking. This isn’t surprising when you consider that networking is the only way to get referrals. According to Undercover Recruiter, only 7% of job applicants get referrals — but those who do get referrals account for 40% of those who get hired. By the time a lot of jobs are posted online, an internal referral process has already come up empty. This means that the job posting is likely to be a “Plan B” situation. The takeaway here is that – like it or not – networking is your best option for getting a PhD-level job.

Read More

The ideal time to start focusing on your job search is now. No matter if you have just started your PhD or if you are unemployed and want a job ASAP, the best thing you can do it start now. Balance Careers reported that roughly it takes one month to find a job for every $10,000 of the paycheck you would like to earn. So, as a PhD if you want to earn $90,000 per year, your job search could take about 9 months. BUT this is an estimate. Depending on the effort your put in and any networking efforts you did before needing a job this time frame can change. The bottom line is that you want to give energy to your job search as soon as possible, but don’t worry if you feel like you are late to the game. In the US alone, in just one month, there were 7.5 million job openings, according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics.There are lots of opportunities for you out there. There is a job that will fit with your specific career aspirations and allow you to do meaningful work as a PhD. Don’t lose hope.

Read More

No one is coming to knock on the door of your lab and offer you a job. Getting a job requires strategy. Large companies, like Google, Microsoft, Pfizer, etc get 1,000s of applications per job opening. If you are relying on luck to make you the 1:1,000 that gets hired, you are going to be waiting a long time. Instead, you should be strategic. Realize that, according to JobScan, 98% of Fortune 500 companies use applicant tracking software to screen resumes. And understand that employers care more about your soft skills than they do about your specific technical skills. Inside Higher Education reported that the most in demand skills according to employers were, listening skills (74%), attention to detail (40%) and effective communication (69%). You need to be taking all this information, and more, into account when crafting your job search strategy.

Read More

If you are using the internet as your main tool for learning about new job opportunities then you are missing out on the vast majority of available jobs. You’re seeing just the tip of the iceberg, as they say. For example, PayScale reported that between 70-80% of jobs are not advertised. Many companies do not advertise positions because the role will be filled through a referral faster than the advertisement can be made. Other companies incentivise employees and prefer candidates who come with a referral. The Association For Talent Development reported that you can expect to earn 6% more if you are hired via a referral. So most positions are never advertised online and you can earn a higher salary if you have a referral. Networking is essential to a successful job search.

Read More

LinkedIn is a huge professional networking platform and it is growing. Hootsuite reported that 2 people join LinkedIn every second and, LinkedIn currently has more than 590 million users. This is an incredible resource for you to leverage. If you are not using LinkedIn you are missing out on a powerful resource. Plus, Forbes reported that 45% of the people on LinkedIn are in upper management. This is a place where you can connect with and learn from company leaders. Within the vast network of LinkedIn you will be able to find people in the companies and positions that you are interested in.

Read More

You cannot ignore the social component of hiring. If a hiring manager or recruiter already knows someone who is a great fit for a new job opening, why would they waste time looking for someone else? They won’t. They will hire the person they know, and you would never have even known that a position was open. Many jobs (up to 85% according to some reports) are never advertised because they are filled by networking. So you are only aware of 15% of the available job openings if you don’t network.

Read More

Behind every job opening there is a person who will decide who gets hired. A person who you will need to make a connection with and prove that you are the right fit for the job. But your efforts to connect with that person should start way before you are in the interview. You should start by networking with people who work at the companies where you want to have an interview, where you want to get hired. You should start networking with the intention of getting a referral.

Read More

51% of recruiters rated having an employee referral as an important factor in hiring, while 89% of recruiters rated company culture fit as an important factor in hiring (Jobvite). Through informational interviews, you can gain referrals and learn how to demonstrate that you are a good culture fit for a company. Having a referral will not only increase your chances of getting hired, it will also increase your starting salary. Having a referral from a business contact increases annual salary by up to $8,700 (Payscale). Informational interviews provide opportunities to build relationships with industry professionals. By first meeting with them with the intention of learning more about their role, and hearing their story, you begin to build rapport. And, as you maintain contact with that person and continue to add value to them, you will be able to ask for a referral when you need it. But, the largest benefit you gain from informational interviews is learning what it’s like to work at a company or in a specific job, day after day.

Read More

It takes hard work and perseverance to get hired in industry. For most positions, a candidate will have 3 interviews before a company decides to hire them (Management Recruiters International Network). But, for certain positions, candidates may have 5 or more interviews before getting hired. So, if you have more than one interview, don’t get discouraged, as this is completely normal. Additionally, the average time it takes someone to get a job is 84 days (Talent Works). Now, 84 days is a long time, especially if you are unemployed. But, that number is not specific for PhD-level positions. For PhD-level positions, it can take even longer to get hired. For example, it can take more than 150 days for a mechanical engineer to get hired. So, you must be resilient in your job search. Keep pushing forward and realize that it’s normal for a PhD-level job search to last many months. Apply the fight and drive that you developed as a PhD to your job search.

Read More

You must realize that you are not the only one searching for a job. 51% of employees are looking for a new opportunity (Gallup). And, every corporate job opening attracts approximately 250 applicants (Glassdoor). But, this number is often much higher for companies like Johnson & Johnson, Allergan, and Celgene etc., where they will get thousands of applicants per position. But, only one applicant will get hired. How do you become that one applicant? Well, it starts with a referral. A referral can land you an interview. But, once you are in front of the hiring committee, it’s all on you. How do you stand out from the other candidates? How do you show your value as a PhD? You do this by preparing for your interview with the same intensity that you prepared for your thesis defense.

Read More

A top concern for 55% of PhDs is their career path (Nature), because many graduate schools do not teach or prepare PhDs for careers outside of the university setting. A survey of more than 800 university staff members from 226 institutions found that 62% of respondents reported that only 44% of universities have professional development programs that prepare graduate students for non-academic careers. And, students are the ones who are suffering (Council of Graduate Schools). Only 33% of graduate students felt that their university provided useful advice about careers outside academia (Nature). If your university is not going to teach you about the opportunities that lie outside of academia, then you are going to learn about them yourself. And, conducting informational interviews with industry professionals gives you a direct line to what is happening in industry.

Read More

The average work week is 38.7 hours long and the average American works an average of 46.8 weeks in a year (Pew Research). There are only 52 weeks in an entire year. Ultimately, your workplace is where you will spend 90% of your year. Before you make a commitment to spend so much of your time somewhere, you need to do your research. One of the biggest things you need to understand is company culture. Company culture is everything from how the company is organized, to how they communicate, to how they dress — and, it’s all important. 89% of hiring failures are due to poor cultural fit (Forbes). Poor cultural fit leaves an employee feeling out of place and unsatisfied. Informational interviews, which often led to referrals, combat this issue. And, when you do decide to work for a particular company, having a referral and an understanding of the company will increase your job satisfaction level by 13% (Undercover Recruiter).

Read More

Are you still doubting the value of networking in your job search? A report in the Academy of Management Journal showed that successful industry professionals spend 70% more time networking than their less successful counterparts. And, Forbes reported that 80% of job openings are never advertised. The only way to achieve success and to have access to the hidden job market is to network with people in industry. But, are you networking to the fullest? If you are only networking online, from the comfort of your couch, then you are not getting all the benefits of networking. In-person contact is extremely valuable in relationship-building (a.k.a. networking). According to Harvard Business Review, a request made in person is 34 times more successful than one made via email. This is because when you speak in person, you are able to communicate so much better than just via text.

Read More

First of all, 85% of jobs are filled through networking (HubSpot). So, if you aren’t networking, you only have access to a small fraction of the total available jobs. But, what does your networking look like? Are you just sending cold messages on LinkedIn, or are you truly investing in people? The only way to make real connections that can last a long time is with in-person networking. Because networking in person is the only way you can fully communicate with another person. Pioneering work by Albert Mehrabian demonstrated that 55% of communication is body language, 38% is the tone of voice, and 7% is the actual words spoken (Psychology Today). Once you are present in person with someone, you have the opportunity to really connect with them — that is, to build a lasting professional relationship. In-person networking, although powerful, can be difficult for many people. So, you need to learn the right and the wrong way to network at in-person events.

Read More

Networking is what will get you hired in industry. 40% of hires come from referrals, but only 7% of applicants even have a referral (Undercover Recruiter). Very few people get referrals because doing so requires effort. Getting a referral requires you to put yourself out there, to meet new people, and to network. This includes in-person networking, which can be tough for introverts. But, the rapport you can build and the value you can gain from physically meeting someone is much higher than what is possible through online networking. A request made in person is 34 times more successful than one made via email (Harvard Business Review). That is a huge difference. Do not underestimate the power of in-person networking and make sure that it is an integral part of your job search strategy.

Read More

75% of employers attend career fairs held at universities (Glassdoor). These career fairs provide an opportunity for job candidates and employers to get valuable face-to-face interactions that they might not have had otherwise. It can be difficult to connect with potential employers face-to-face outside of these events. But, this in-person contact is very valuable. A request made in person is 34 times more successful than one made via email (Harvard Business Review). 34 times more successful! The mere opportunity to speak face-to-face with your target company at a career fair improves your chances of getting hired. But, you have to know how to make the most of these career fair events.

Read More

To get hired as fast as possible, in-person networking should be a high priority in your job search. The words we choose when communicating are only 7% of how we actually communicate (Psychology Today). And, when networking online through emails and messaging, word choice is the only part of your communication that is coming across. The most important components of how we communicate — such as body language, facial expressions, and tone of voice — are left out of online networking. That means the only way to fully communicate with someone is in person. As PhDs, many of us are introverted, and we tend to avoid in-person networking events. Instead, we choose to network online, where we can just write — which is something PhDs are experts at. But, merely networking online is not enough. Approximately 80% of job openings are never advertised (Forbes). You have to network and meet new people in order to learn about the majority of job openings.

Read More

Employee referrals account for 72% of all interviews (Society of Human Resource Management), and 1 out of every 5 candidates with a job referral gets hired (Undercover Recruiter). If you are not on LinkedIn building up your network and investing in your connections, you are missing out on a huge resource that will boost your job search. Not only that, networking often leads to referrals which will benefit you after you get hired as well. A referral raises wages of workers in their first year at the firm by 6.7 ± 3.4% (The Review Of Economic Studies). That’s an increase in starting salary from $75,000 to $80,000 per year. Companies place a lot of value on referrals because ultimately, job candidates who come from referrals make better employees. As a PhD, you already have many advantages over other job candidates, and with a referral you will immediately become a top candidate. But, you have to put in the work.

Read More

Referrals are the number one source of hires and are routinely how companies bring in the highest quality employees. Industry companies know how valuable referrals are, and they reward employees who refer successful new hires. 65% of companies have built-in bonus programs for rewarding employees who refer a successful job candidate (World At Work). Companies want to hire job candidates who come with referrals because they know they are more likely to find high quality employees. And, having a referral will benefit you in the long term, too. Job candidates who were referred by a business contact can see up to an $8,200 boost in starting salary (PayScale)!

Read More

Networking, with the the goal of obtaining a referral, is the fastest way to get hired. This is because industry employers value internal referrals. Employee referrals account for 72% of all interviews (Society of Human Resource Management). And, 1 out of every 5 candidates with a job referral gets hired (Undercover Recruiter). Companies prefer to hire candidates with referrals. Companies place a lot of value on referrals because ultimately, they make better employees. Referrals result in a higher employee retention rate — 46% at one year, versus 33% for candidates who were hired through a career site (Undercover Recruiter). This indicates that with a referral, not only do your chances of getting hired increase, you will also likely find a job that you are highly satisfied with. It’s a win-win.

Read More

Women are underrepresented in STEM careers. Only 14.5% of engineers are women, only 26.4% of math and computer science positions are filled by women, and only 27.8% of professionals working in the physical sciences are women (National Science Foundation). As a woman with a PhD who is looking to get hired in the STEM fields, you are a minority. And, this makes networking very important. Because, as a PhD, you are qualified for more than just an entry position in industry. You have the technical and transferable skills required to secure a management position in industry. But, women are also underrepresented in management positions. Only 4.8% of Fortune 500 companies have a woman CEO (Fortune). As a woman with a STEM PhD, you are capable of securing an industry management level position that can lead to a C-level position. But you will need to network.

Read More

A recent study found that 70% of people were hired at a company where they had a connection (LinkedIn). 70%! As a job seeker, you must know how to network on LinkedIn. If you do not know how to use LinkedIn, you are missing out on an enormous resource. The power of LinkedIn actually goes beyond your “first connections” because most job referrals come from second and third degree connections (Fast Company). And, not only do job referrals boost your chances at getting hired, but referrals have also been shown to increase starting salary. A study in The Review Of Economic Studies journal found that a referral raises wages of workers in their first year at a firm by 6.7 ± 3.4%. LinkedIn is a fantastic resource to build your network and increase your chances of getting a referral. But, you have to know how to network on LinkedIn successfully.

Read More

LinkedIn is a great platform to find and connect with industry professionals. It allows you to reach out to people who work at the companies you are interested in that you would not have had access to otherwise. To make the most of LinkedIn as a way to connect with people at your target companies, you can use the LinkedIn search feature, get introductions from people in your current network, and look at the company website to find specific people you want to reach out to. For the most effective use of LinkedIn, you should use a combination of these strategies. And always remember, in any networking situation, you must add value first. Never begin a conversation by asking for something. Give the new connection a reason to want to talk to you. If you can do that, then you are on the right track to building a solid professional connection.

Read More

Job postings usually do not include the name of the person who you should address your cover letter to. And, you may be tempted to address your cover letter, “To Whom It May Concern”. Doing this will set you up to fail. Take the initiative to find out whose name you should put on your cover letter. Always call the company first if you are not sure who to address the cover letter to. Then, if that doesn’t work, you can try other tactics such as networking, reading the job posting more thoroughly, finding out who your supervisor would be, and searching online. When you do find out who you should address your cover letter to, you will present as a much stronger candidate and will be more likely to succeed in getting an interview.

Read More

Getting a job referral is by far the best way to get an industry position, but you have to earn a job referral. The best way to accomplish this is through quality networking, both online and in person. Once you reach the place where you want to ask for a job referral, there are a few things that you need to make sure you do before you make the ask. You need to build a professional relationship with your connection, demonstrate that you have good work habits, show your passion for the position, determine if you are a good fit for the company culture, and demonstrate the overall value that you will bring to the company. A job referral is very powerful and often the key to getting an interview or getting hired. Do not take asking for a referral lightly, and only do so after you have earned the trust and respect of your connection.

Read More

Recruiters are a great resource to use during your job search. But, you must make a good impression on the recruiter by approaching them in an appropriate way. Make sure you avoid common mistakes when reaching out to recruiters such as: trying to make small talk, contacting recruiters from a field unrelated to your target jobs, asking about only one specific position, having an unprofessional LinkedIn profile or resume, and not providing the recruiter with the information they need in the very first message you send them. As a PhD, you are valuable and recruiters can connect you with opportunities that you may not have been aware of otherwise. Just make sure you reach out to them in an appropriate way.

Read More

When looking for positions abroad, it can seem daunting and impossible. You face the problems of distance, cultural clashes, and visas. However, living in a different country can be extremely rewarding. It will broaden your perspective in a way no other experience can. The key to obtaining an industry position abroad is to start networking with people from abroad. If you wisely utilize online tools, have an active online presence, join international groups, and connect with other expats, you can easily network from abroad and successfully transition into industry.

Read More

A job referral doubles your chance of getting an interview and increases the likelihood you will be hired by 40%. Investing in your professional network, particularly your existing network, and leveraging those connections is the best way to get job referrals fast. Add value to those people in your network and create genuine connections with them. This will create opportunities where you can request referrals. PhDs are great candidates for top industry positions, and job referrals will make sure your resume gets noticed. Here are five ways to tap into your current network to get industry job referrals fast.

Read More

Women PhDs are poised to enter into leadership roles and yet many don’t have the confidence to go for them. The truth is that women with PhDs have an opportunity to impact corporate culture and societal change in unique ways with their strengths and experience. Many let imposter syndrome and a lack of confidence hold them back. But, businesses and society alike need women to find their voice and use it to enact change. Here are three reasons why women with PhDs need to be in leadership roles in industry.

Read More

Attending a networking event is one small piece of the networking puzzle. The real work comes when you try and nurture this connection. You need to continue to follow-up with them over time and be memorable. You have to invest in building rapport with industry connections if you want a chance at an industry job. Being genuine and consistent in your contact with your network will establish you as a front runner for any industry position that opens up. Your fit for the company will be established early on, setting you up for success. Here are 5 ways to build rapport with industry professionals.

Read More

Having a job search strategy is the only way a Life Science PhD will be successful in landing a top industry position. Without a strategy, their experience in academia merely translates to an entry-level job working for someone with half their qualifications. Getting a top job in industry means investing in an organized, consistent approach to prove you are worthy of the industry job you deserve. Here are 5 strategies that will help you transition into a top Life Science position in industry.

Read More

PhDs know the value of networking to gain access to industry jobs. Yet, many network ineffectively or refuse to network altogether. Those who do network get caught in common networking traps that result in loss of rapport, opportunity, and even reputation. By avoiding the 7 deadly sins of networking outlined in this article, PhDs can increase their odds of making a good impression to industry professionals and unlocking the hidden market of industry jobs.

Read More

Recognizing the emotional intelligence you developed during academia will help you get ahead in your job search. To recruiters and hiring managers, emotional intelligence is seen as more valuable than logical intelligence. Emotional intelligence gives you the ability to express yourself appropriately in high-pressure situations and gives you the know-how you need to effectively resolve conflict. Here are 5 academic emotional intelligence skills all PhDs have.

Read More

Referrals are the number one choice for job hires but obtaining these referrals takes time, and requires networking and adding value to industry professionals. Don’t wait until after graduation to take this on. Make the investment in networking and building industry relationships early, and tend to them often. Offering value to your industry connections will help build meaningful connections and increase your chances of getting a referral. Here are 5 ways to add value during your networking interactions with industry professionals.

Read More

Mastering the skill of networking is no easy task. Most PhDs find networking awkward and try to avoid it. Yet, learning how to carry yourself with confidence and start conversations with people at networking events can yield significant benefits to your job search strategy. Equally important is the skill of gracefully and professionally exiting a conversation when it’s appropriate and without appearing rude or lacking confidence. Here’s how to do both.

Read More

If you want to get a job referral and maximize your job hunting efforts, you need to stop making common networking mistakes. You need to start networking in unconventional locations and in unconventional ways. You also need to start communicating your transferable skills, not just your technical skills. Here are 3 common networking blunders that keep many PhDs unemployed, as well as how to avoid them.

Read More

Independently piloting your career transition may initially seem like a noble endeavor, but you are missing out on a vital lifeline of support. Mentors and mentor networks will help you build your professional network and validate your job search and career trajectory. They will prepare you for every step of the transition process — from resumes to negotiation — and will help you cope when things fail, and celebrate when they succeed. You will execute your transition and start your new job filled with confidence and motivation with an ongoing network of support and shared interests. Here’s how.

Read More

Having a PhD is a significant advantage. Don’t let other people confuse you. PhDs get paid higher than non-PhDs and are in high demand. Trained professionals who know how to create information, not just repackage it, are desperately needed. If you have a PhD or are on your way to having one and you’re reading this, you are poised to enter into any alternative career of your choice. The only thing that can hold you back is yourself. Here is the survey data you need to get into the alternative career path of your choice.

Read More

Finding an industry job is its own full-time job. PhDs lack the resources and knowledge to transition out of academia as easily as they might have thought. The market is competitive and many PhDs opt in for the default postdoc they think they have to do before transitioning into industry. That idea is an archaic trap. To find an industry job, PhDs need to put time and effort into diversifying their job search strategy and use multiple sources if they want to ever make it in front of a hiring manager. Here are the top 3 sources for PhDs looking to expand their career search.

Read More

When it comes to getting job referrals, it’s not what you know but who you know. This is especially true for PhDs looking to transition out of academia and into an industry job. An industry referral will separate you from thousands of other candidates and give you the biggest advantage for landing an interview and getting hired. If you want an industry job, stop blindly applying through online job sites and start making in-person connections. Build your network to increase your chances of landing a referral. Here’s how.

Read More

Due diligence simply means taking reasonable steps to prepare for something. It means getting informed. In industry, due diligence refers to gathering information in order to make an informed decision prior to a merger, acquisition, job hiring, or any other important event. As a PhD, you hold yourself to the same standard. In other words, you should do your own due diligence before choosing a career where you will spend the majority of your daily time and efforts. When it comes to a job search, the most effective way to do your due diligence is by setting up informational interviews with industry professionals. Here’s how to leverage informational interviews for your job search.

Read More

When a current employee of a company refers a job candidate, that candidate is hired by the company about two-thirds of the time. Top companies only resort to advertising a job when they cannot find the right candidate through other channels, such as ‘word of mouth’ or referrals. This is because advertising jobs online is a painful process for hiring managers. These managers have to wade through thousands of job applications from people they do not know. By setting up an informational interview, you are able to learn about an alternative career while also strategically placing yourself within the hidden job market of the company. Here’s how to quickly and effectively set up informational interviews.

Read More

According to Quint Careers, only 5% of job seekers obtain jobs through online advertisements. Only 15-20% of all available jobs are ever publicly advertised in any medium. Do you now understand how much time you’re wasting by only uploading resumes to jobs you see online? Do you now see how much you’re embarrassing yourself by continuing to do this? Your time is too precious to waste on 5% odds. Why not direct your attention to the other 95%? Here are 3 ways to redesign your job search strategy for a smooth transition into industry.

Read More

Job referrals lead to better jobs where both you and your employer will be happier with the fit. So, how do you get a job referral? You network. It’s that simple and it’s that hard. You must start forging reciprocal relationships with industry professionals. You need to show you are an open, giving and intelligent PhD, able to make a connection, add value, and then ask for a reference in the appropriate manner. But you can’t be lazy. You can’t be greedy or needy either. There’s a right way and wrong way to network and you need to know both. Here are 10 networking mistakes you must avoid if you want a job in industry.

Read More

PhDs face an incredible challenge when it comes to securing jobs. Academia cannot absorb all the graduates that are passing through. On top of this, many PhDs are either unable or unwilling to transition into an industry position. On the other hand, there is an inaccurate image of PhDs from industry. Many companies in industry believe that a PhD’s knowledge base is too specialized. They believe that PhDs have little ability to be multidisciplinary and are trained only for research-type positions. There is a mutual ignorance and mistrust. As a result, if you want a job in industry, you must diversify your job search. You must make lateral moves that increase your visibility. You must be willing to keep your options open and seize new opportunities when they arise. Here’s how.

Read More

Networking correctly is not easy.

If you’re networking correctly, you’re investing your time and energy into developing long-term professional relationships. Networking takes work. It takes effort and engagement. You can’t merely show up to an event, throw a few business cards at people, and expect to get a strong job referral. Instead, you have to show up, build rapport, and offer value even when you feel like you have nothing to offer. The worst thing you can do is show up to an event and beg for connections, cling onto one person the whole night, or check your phone repeatedly. You should not only avoid these people at your next networking event, you should also ensure that you don’t become one of them. Here are five people NOT to turn into at your next networking event.

Read More

You must give value before asking for value. If you want a job in industry, the time to start giving value to hiring managers, recruiters, and industry professionals is now. The reason most PhDs refuse to network with industry professionals is because they don’t think they have any value to offer to these professionals. Either they feel like they’re asking for a handout, which makes them uncomfortable, or they feel like they shouldn’t have to ask for help because help should be given to them automatically. You have value to offer industry professionals, especially if you have a PhD. As a PhD, you’re capable of appreciating other people’s scientific work. You’re capable of solving other people’s complex problems. Most importantly, you’re capable connecting high-level professionals to each other. Whether you know it or not, you have value to offer. Here is the number one way to add value to industry professionals and get the industry position you want.

Read More

When it comes to getting an industry job, your network is more valuable than your PhD.

Too many PhDs completely ignore the development of their interpersonal skills. As a result, these PhDs act atrociously at networking events. Instead of building strong connections, they repel and annoy industry professionals. These rude PhDS talk incessantly about themselves, interrupt others, talk in condescending tones, and come off as awkward, insecure, and disrespectful. If you ever want a job in industry, you must start networking as if you are already a successful industry professional. You must stop misbehaving at networking events. Here are 7 things successful industry PhDs never do at networking events.

Read More

The recruiting process is an important part of transitioning into industry and should not be ignored.

Doing your homework on the company and position you’re interested in is not enough to secure a non-academic job. You also need to do your homework on the recruiting agency that will best fit your needs. You need to build relationships with these agencies and, more importantly, with individual recruiters. The key is that most recruiters are NOT going to seek you out. You must seek them out. You must send emails, cold call, and follow up over and over until you’ve built a strong relationship. Only then will you become known in the recruiting world and start having job offers sent to you personally. Here are 5 tips for successfully building relationships with biotech and biopharmaceutical recruiters.

Read More

If you feel out of place at noisy, crowded networking events, you’re not alone.

Studies show that that introverts make up one-third to half of the population.
Once you realize you’re not alone in your fear or discomfort of networking, things will start getting better. Those other smiling faces at the networking events you’ve been attending are uncomfortable too. Like you, they’re human. By executing the right strategies, you can start channeling your nervous energy productively. You can go from hiding in the corner at networking events to easily walking up to someone to introduce yourself and ask intelligent questions. Here’s are 6 things you can do to overcome and leverage your introverted tendencies to become an expert networker.

Read More

If you’ve decided to transition into an industry position, there’s nothing your advisor can do to help you or harm you.

Getting an industry job is up to you and you alone, so stop fearing your advisor and start standing up for yourself. At first, it may be difficult to say “no” to your advisor or any other high-level academic, but it will get easier over time. Take action now to change the dynamic of your relationship with your advisor and to change the trajectory of your career for the better. Be respectful of your advisor but remember to respect yourself as well. Here’s how.

Read More

By focusing on how to network in today’s economy and academic environment, you can put yourself ahead of the competition and get the industry position of your choice. The key is being strategic in your job search, following up properly, and surrounding yourself with the right people. Developing your interpersonal skills will be vital to your success and will become much more important than your technical skills. Follow these 8 critical networking tips for advancing your career as a PhD.

Read More

Learning to follow up properly is the most important thing PhDs can do to get an industry job faster. Instead of showing up to networking events without a plan, start creating specific goals for each event and following up with the people you meet afterwards. Instead of leaving an interview and waiting weeks to hear back, start sending thank you emails the very same day and personal letters the next day. Here are other follow up strategies you should be using.

Read More

PhD students often let themselves get obsessed with making one or two people happy. They fight for the approval of a select few who will never treat them as equals instead of working to build relationships with positive people who will like them just the way they are. They allow negative people not only to stay in their lives, but to influence their decisions. This is a mistake for two essential reasons. First, positive people will not come into your life until the negative ones are gone. Second, you cannot do positive and meaningful work with negative people dragging you down.

Read More

During your industry job search, you are a product introducing yourself to new markets.

When you go to typical University or PhD, biotech, or biopharma-labeled events, you’re introducing yourself to what is known as Red Ocean markets. These markets are full of your competitors. The markets are bloody and unlikely to yield any results. Start introducing yourself to Blue Ocean markets–events where you will meet people who won’t compete with you and who will help you get the industry position you want.

Read More

Have you gone to a scientific conference lately? Have you worked a booth? If so, you’ve probably noticed how many students, starving postdocs, and unemployed PhDs come up to you asking for a job. It’s not their fault though. They just want to get paid a decent salary for a change. If you’re behind the booth, it’s annoying. You’re there to help your customers, not to get someone a job. If you’re in front of the booth trying to get a business card, it’s painful. Walking up and introducing yourself to strangers in the hopes of getting a job is uncomfortable. Yet, it’s one of the only ways to get a name for a cover letter and to network with people who have the jobs that you want.

Read More

Almost half of all job hires at top tier companies are from networking referrals. If you’re about to graduate and haven’t started networking yet, it’s not too late. There are some things you can do to get you back on track fast. Here are 5 things that will help you get ahead and transition into industry.

Read More

The best way for scientists to advance their projects and careers is by growing their networks. And the best way to grow your network is by learning how to build strong relationships quickly. This means understanding the psychology behind creating an instant and lasting connection. Here are 16 psychological tips scientists should keep in mind when networking with other people.

Read More

The new rules of networking in graduate school involve both online and offline techniques targeted at key opinion leaders as well as your peers. These rules focus on building connections, not just in academia, but also in business and entrepreneurship. But don’t get overwhelmed. And don’t try to do everything at once. Instead, gradually branch out and slowly increase your risk tolerance until you’re comfortable contacting anyone, online, in person, or otherwise. Here are the new rules.

Read More