Skip to content

The main reason you should be looking for an industry job instead of staying in academia is simple: There are too many academic research scientists. Nature reported that in recent years, the number of academic research scientists jumped by 150% in the U.S. alone. Meanwhile, the number of tenured and other full-time faculty positions has plateaued and, in many places, even declined. Around 10% of all postdocs had been going on for more than 6 years. Imagine doing a postdoc for 6 or more years. A lot of PhDs don’t have to imagine that scenario – they are living it. Academia doesn’t value its researchers because there are too many of them. Yet in industry, there are not enough. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, industry employment for biotechnology and biopharmaceutical scientists was projected to grow 13% over the last decade. Society has become increasingly reliant on technology and pharmaceuticals. They are also becoming more affluent, allowing for more spending on medicine. As a result, industry employers need PhD-level research scientists. The problem is that few PhDs know how to get hired into industry R&D positions, and even fewer know what life will be like once they’re hired. I had both of these problems until I joined the Cheeky Scientist Association. The Association taught me what I needed to know to get hired, and has continued to support me in my industry career.

Read More

Medical Science Liaison (MSL) roles are growing fast. These roles are actually one of the top 10 industry careers for PhDs right now. How do you like the thought of jet-setting across the country in your tailored suit, discussing science with high-level thought leaders, and earning a great salary? Does that sound like a nice change from working in a lab for peanuts? It did to me, that’s for sure. In 2019, the median salary of MSLs was more than $122,000. But the MSL position isn’t right for everyone. MSLs undertake cutting-edge, scientific discussions on drug therapy and disease states. They do this with leading healthcare providers in both academic and community-based settings. Transitioning into an MSL position requires strategic thinking and the ability to ensure individual needs are met while staying aligned with the overall objectives of the company. There has to be a strong match between your personality and values, and the culture and values of the company for which you end up working. You need to understand yourself and what you want as well as how other people see you. Medical science liaising is an inherently social practice. It demands a personable, outgoing attitude; good communication; and excellent teaching skills. Some people are simply better suited to solitary work. But as a PhD, for the longest time, I tried to fit myself into a box: the independent scientist, alone at the bench with a microscope, laptop, coffee, and copious notes. Yet I loved to present my research in front of others, to mingle at conferences… I wanted to talk science with anyone who was willing to join me. If this sounds familiar, you might be a perfect fit for the MSL role.

Read More
These 5 skills will qualify PhDs to get hired as clinical research associates

“Clinical research associate” ranks #84 on CNN Money’s list of the 100 “Best Jobs in America,” and with a median pay of $76k, you can begin to see why. In fact, according to a U.K. government report, industry workers in the life sciences earn more than the average income of those employed in any other economic sector. Despite this, you shouldn’t chalk up the amazing benefits of this career to mere income… From life-saving medical apparatuses to carefully refined treatments for lifelong debilitations, clinical research associates have a powerful connection to innovations in medicine. You’d have a tough time naming a career with greater impact and importance than this one. Clinical trials work puts PhDs at the forefront of modern medicine and its powerful applications – scientific advancements that change–and save–lives. Obviously, most PhDs have scientific expertise. They have mastered the crucial talents of data analysis and documentation, and this is exactly why employers tend to prefer PhD graduates as they go on the hunt for clinical research candidates.

Read More

Some PhDs haven’t heard about–or even considered–the medical writing career path. But in spite of our different backgrounds, a lot of PhDs can become qualified to dive into medical writer roles. As the job title indicates, written communication skills are very important for this position. Medical writing is essentially an umbrella term that covers everything from writing about medicine to editing, translating, and project management. And industry needs professionals to fill this role – the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates that by 2026, specialized writing roles of this kind are expected to grow 11% from 2016.

Read More

As in the case of Silvan Mueller, Business Development Manager of Bel Power Solutions & Protection, a background in STEM opens up a big door for PhDs. Even if they don’t realize it. After all, a huge concern of many PhDs is that they lack the business experience to enter into a business development role. But the business school of your university probably offers a series of courses aimed at business novices, so those can be a great resource. It’s possible your department would offer a tuition waiver for these, though you shouldn’t count on that. Some management departments even offer business development courses tailored to technical work in sectors like IT or biotechnology. Even if none of these are an option for you, Nature agrees that the right combination of technical and interpersonal skills makes business development a major opportunity for PhDs. If you’re still not certain, don;t forget that sometimes, PhDs enter a company in a technical role before transitioning to business development once they’ve acquired some industry knowledge.

Read More

Even at the entry level, a career as a medical science liaison is very lucrative. It’s true that PhDs can expect excellent industry salaries, but medical science liaisons are special cases. Data from Payscale indicates that medical science liaisons with entry-level experience can expect an average base salary of $116K. This is a high-demand position, and it’s reflected in the pay. Additionally, the Bureau of Labor speculated that medical science positions in general are experiencing a faster-than-average growth rate of 8%. Other countries might have different titles for this position, like “medical associate” or something similar, but worldwide, it’s a very popular position for PhDs. Not to mention the networking opportunities — 98% of medical science liaisons stated that they manage relationships with key opinion leaders (KOLs) in the industry. This is a standard part of the job, and a KOL is definitely the kind of contact you want in your professional network.

Read More

If you think that project managers aren’t crucial employees to have, think again – the Project Management Institute reports that 85% of firms have a project management office. If salary is any indication of importance, Glassdoor confirms an average pay of approximately $75,000 annually among project managers. Companies don’t just hand out money like that – project managers are valuable assets. There are a lot of different certification programs for project manager positions, but would you like to know a little secret? You don’t need one. It can certainly help, but if you’re a PhD, you don’t have to pay thousands of dollars for a certification – you already have the transferable skills required. That skill is R&D project management, and PhDs have been practicing it on a daily basis in their research, dating back through grad school. Anyone who’s worked in a university lab, or been a TA, has had to manage different academic projects. That means you know how it’s done, and you can take that knowledge with you into an industry career in project management.

Read More

Application scientists help customers use and apply a company’s products. As ASBMB indicates, it’s very common to find job postings for application scientist positions that ask specifically for PhDs. And in most cases, application scientists will need to hold a doctoral degree. This is because they’re experts who draw from heavy science experience to use and teach others about complex products. Usually, science application happens in a STEM field like engineering or biotechnology. Science-based companies like Thermo-Fisher represent the sort of employer that needs PhDs who can interact directly with customers on their behalf. These customers won’t usually be laypeople – very often, they are actually PhDs, MDs, or other researchers. They might be people who use medical devices, computer systems, or other advanced technologies in their daily work. Put bluntly by David Freed, a medical doctor is not necessarily a scientist, so there is a powerful need for science experts to fill that gap. As an application scientist, your job will be to teach customers the proper application of your company’s products. However, you’ll also train sales support staff, who need to be informed sellers of the product lines. A sales team doesn’t necessarily have a background in STEM, but an application scientist does, and he or she will use that experience to educate the people around them.

Read More

It’s no surprise to anyone that data scientists dig through a lot of data. While working for a company, they might collect data from in-the-field sales personnel or key stakeholders, such as liaisons or application scientists. A data scientist position is very numbers-heavy, and it can be fairly writing-heavy too. This role will involve writing extensive written reports that take analyzed data and communicate it to other personnel. But data scientists are too few in number. McKinsey and Company predicted that going forward, data scientists will be in high demand, and that there is a serious shortage of analytical talent. Of course, any time there’s a shortage, supply and demand come into effect. For data scientists, high demand translates to a very high salary: according to Glassdoor, the U.S. national average is $117,000.

Read More

Humanities PhDs have no reason to believe that they lack exciting career opportunities in the future. A PhD is a doctorate in knowledge. As a PhD, you create new knowledge that did not exist before. While creating new knowledge, you gain critical transferable skills that you can leverage to build a career outside your own area of expertise. An excellent humanities education prepares an individual in creative and critical-thinking, and persuasion in areas outside of technology.

Read More

In academia, your supposed career path is fairly well defined. Get a PhD, do a postdoc(s), publish well, and try to get a professorship. Not so in industry. There are many career paths to choose from. In fact, industry is all-set to be the major employer of PhDs in future. According to the U.S. National Science Foundation’s (NSF’s) biennial Survey of Doctorate Recipients, for the first time in 2017, industry hiring of PhDs was on par with academia. Realize that as a PhD your skillset is incredibly diverse. You just need to adjust your perspective.

Read More

All of the major tech, biopharma, or medical companies need science communicators. All of the major news outlets need science communicators. All museums and education institutions need science communicators. There are many ways that you can use your STEM PhD and your passion for writing in an industry career. Here are 5 science communication careers for PhDs who enjoy talking and writing about science.

Read More

The biotech and biopharma industry is growing rapidly. ContractPharma reported that the biotechnology market was valued at $330 billion in 2015 and is expected to more than double by 2024 to $775 billion. With that incredibly rapid growth comes massive and fast change. New technologies and innovations create an atmosphere of constant change and industry needs employees who can thrive under these conditions. They need leaders.They need PhDs. According to a study published in PLOS One, a few of the most valuable transferable skills that PhDs have are the ability to gather and interpret information and the ability to learn quickly. As a PhD you can learn and interpret data better and faster than almost anyone else. It is one of your most valuable skills. And it is a skill that can be applied to all industry positions. So whatever type of position you are interested in your fast learning will be an asset that employers want.

Read More

Business.com reported that 22% of staff turnover occurs within the first 45 days. Just 45 days, and almost a quarter of the employees leave. Additionally, the Harvard Business Review reported that 33% of new hires look for jobs in the first 6 months. Bad onboarding makes people want to leave. But, good onboarding not only encourages employees to stay it actually makes them more productive. The Society for Human Resource Management reported that Strong onboarding processes improve new-hire retention by 82% and productivity by over 70%. Onboarding is incredibly important for finding success at a company. So, you need to be prepared to create a good onboarding experience for yourself, even if the company does not have a formal onboarding process.

Read More

The environment in many academic institutions is toxic. Up to 42% of academics have experienced some form of bullying in academia (Nature). This bullying is causing many PhDs to experience Imposter Syndrome. People who suffer from Imposter Syndrome are less satisfied with their jobs, have a negative impact on the company they work for, and earn a lower salary than those people without Imposter Syndrome (Frontiers In Psychology). To succeed outside academia, you must change your mindset. The Imposter Syndrome and mindset you learned in academia will not serve you in industry.

Read More

To ace an industry interview, you must not only know what to do during an interview, but also what NOT to do.

Any PhD can craft a successful industry resume. But not every PhD can show up to an interview, make a great first impression, and get a job offer. Too many PhDs blow their first interview by not taking it seriously. The worst thing you can do during a job search is work hard for months (not to mention the years it took to get your PhD) and then mess it all up in the first 90 seconds of meeting an employer. A better strategy is to prepare strenuously for every interview and express yourself exceptionally well during those first few minutes. Here’s what NOT to do during an industry job interview.

Read More

Many PhDs may not think that going into a business career is an option for them. However, there is an increasing demand for PhDs, and their expertise, within the business world. Not only do PhDs have the research and analytical skills needed for these positions, they are highly self-motivated. You could transition into a management consulting role, a business development role, or become an entrepreneur and start your own business. PhDs know how to be resilient in the face of uncertainties. These skills make PhDs extremely well-equipped to succeed in business.

Read More

Medical Science Liaison, or MSL, positions are increasingly popular among PhDs for a reason. According to the U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics, medical professions such as MSL roles are among the fastest growing industries between 2012 and 2022.These roles are also expected to be paid very well.
Payscale estimates that MSLs will continue to earn a median salary of over $100,000 USD a year. The best news is that top companies currently hiring MSLs favor hiring PhDs over PharmDs (30.9% and 30.1%, respectively). The key to transitioning into your first MSL role will be networking and aligning your transferable skills with this special career choice. Here are 5 other things PhDs must do to transition into an MSL position.

Read More

As a STEM PhD, you are not limited to a career in academia. If medical writing is something you are interested in, go out and do it. Your STEM PhD experience has set you up with the skills to become a medical writer. And, if you listen to the tips laid out here, they will help you succeed in medical writing. Decide if you want to do freelance or staff medical writing, develop your aptitude for writing, know how to reach out to recruiters, add value to get and keep clients, and be forward-thinking so you are prepared for the next phase of your medical writing career. You have what it takes to leave academia, and if medical writing is the career for you, these tips will help you find success.

Read More

PhDs who are interested in business, but want to maintain a connection with academia, should consider a role in technology transfer. Here, you will be able to facilitate connections between academics and industry professionals to help bring a new technology to market. As a PhD, you already have many of the transferable skills hiring managers are looking for in technology transfer professionals. These transferable skills include: relationship-building to create academia-industry partnerships, high-level commercial acumen and strategic planning to assess and protect new technologies, ability to promote new inventions, and an entrepreneurial mindset to develop successful spin-off companies.

Read More

There is a wide range of industry positions that are great options for PhDs. One lesser known, but quite lucrative position is that of a quantitative analyst. These positions are in high demand and PhDs have many of the skills needed for this role. PhDs who are experts with data sets and data mining, who have strong mathematical and statistical backgrounds, and who have an interest in finance, are well-suited for a role as a quantitative analyst. PhDs who can work under pressure and who have excellent communication skills will be able to succeed in quantitative analysis roles. With a wide range of potential employers and an increasing demand, quantitative analysis roles are an excellent career choice for PhDs.

Read More

No matter what stage of your career you are at, it is not too late to consider changing to a remote working position. The amount of people working remotely is increasing as people become more focused on having a good work-life balance. Working remotely allows you the freedom to choose when and where you work without sacrificing pay. By transitioning out of academia and into an industry position, not only will you finally be paid well, but there are many job options that offer the ability to work remotely, including medical writing, scientific editing, consulting, translating, and senior CRA positions. Thanks to the Internet, working from home has never been easier.

Read More

While the work environment within academia is poor and often unsupportive, there are many industry companies who are dedicated to investing in their employees and who pride themselves on having a good culture. Not all companies will have the same type of culture, so it’s important that you take the time to research and find out if a company’s culture is suitable for you. To determine if a company is a good fit for you, speak with current and past employees, research the company’s online presence, and ask the right questions during your interview. This will help you to find your ideal job and company so you can successfully leave academia and transition into industry.

Read More

Do not be strung along by the academic system and work as an underpaid postdoc for upwards of 10 years, only to be denied the academic position you wanted. There are endless industry opportunities available to social science PhDs outside of academia. As a PhD, you can learn anything. You can learn to write an excellent resume and cover letter. But, if you don’t know what types of jobs are out there, you won’t be able to successfully transition into industry. No matter how much preparation you do, you need to know what areas to target. Here is a list of the top 10 industry positions for social science PhDs.

Read More

Only 4% of projects fail because of technical issues. On the contrary, 36% of projects fail because of poor management. Proving that you have the leadership ability to manage teams is worth more to a company than proving you have the technical know-how. Leadership encompasses many characteristics. You can easily develop and hone leadership skills while still in academia.

Read More

As more European nations strive to emulate the growing interest in life sciences and biopharma industry, government initiatives are rising to meet the need. The bioscience sector in Europe looks promising, with more predicted growth and job opportunities forecasted. If you are a PhD planning to work in the industry, it would be worthwhile to identify and target these clusters as they offer multiple opportunities in one location. Here are the top six life science industry cluster areas to get you started.

Read More

For PhDs transitioning into industry, proving that you have an understanding of the economics that impact business shows that you understand the very basics of how business works. Using your experience in academia and how you managed economics there provides a foundation for transferable skills for industry. Understanding the economic hierarchy of an organization will take PhDs intending to transition, or already in industry, a long way in their careers moving forward.

Read More

Nothing replaces face-to-face interaction. Meetings are your opportunity to find your voice and make your unique contribution. In industry, effective meetings are the lifeblood of moving projects forward. If you want to make a good impression with your team and your managers, you have to be both professional and assertive. The common trap of hiding behind computer screens and piles of work is not going to help you be successful in industry. Raise your visibility in the company by being assertive. Here are 5 ways to be assertive in business meetings.

Read More

Academia is not the only place for you if you have a humanities PhD. There are not enough jobs for the number of PhDs, so it’s important to start leveraging your transferable skills and start building your network. Alternative networks and careers exist that are perfect for you with companies that will value your skills. Here are 10 alternative careers in industry that humanities PhDs should consider targeting in their industry transition.

Read More

Some PhDs are most comfortable and even most passionate alone in a lab. But it’s not for everyone. Many PhDs find that level of isolation depressing and understimulating. Extroverted PhDs can thrive in industry jobs that have challenge, stimulation, and social contact. If you’re one of these, then your transferable skills put you in high demand for any of these 5 industry jobs with high levels of professional growth and income.

Read More

Transitioning into an industry job is just the first step of building a fulfilling career. Too many PhDs can find themselves working in jobs that provide little more derived satisfaction and happiness than when they were still in academia. If you fail to identify your values and align your job trajectory to those values, you’ll end up taking the first job offer you get — even if it’s not the right fit. Taking some time for introspection in this area will help you filter out companies that are in conflict with your core values and help you get closer to the ones that are. Here’s how.

Read More

Taking the guesswork out of your industry job search includes knowing where to look and how to access the market. Life science industry is doing well and growing, but it is heavily clustered. Missing out on these key areas of opportunity limits your success in landing the industry job you want. Focusing your job search strategy to target these cluster areas increases your ability to network into an industry job that is specific to your career goals in an area that is thriving. Here are the final 3 life science clusters to attack in your job search.

Read More

If you are a PhD who wants to transition into a life science industry job, you have more choices and opportunities than you might realize. PhDs are not just limited to high visibility pharmaceutical companies anymore. Now, PhDs have an abundance of opportunity in life science clusters in key growth areas throughout the U.S. Targeting companies in these clusters is a fast and effective way to get hired into small to mid-level startups all the way through to larger pharmaceutical companies.

Read More

Every PhD has transferable skills that qualify them for jobs beyond what they think they would be hired for. Break down the skills you have acquired during your PhD and you’ll find specific examples of when you demonstrated qualities like communication skills, leadership, conflict resolution, strategic planning, and time management. When applying for a management job you can show how these skills can transfer into results that will benefit a company in an industry job and impress hiring managers and recruiters with just how qualified you are.

Read More

Innovation and development in the top life science clusters are growing at a rapid and exciting rate. PhDs must take advantage of this growth by highlighting their transferable skills in the right market areas. With trends supporting continued and steady growth in life science fields and specific clusters reporting impressive hiring numbers and incoming funding, targeting key companies in specific clusters maximizes your chances for an industry job. Here are the top 4 life science clusters in the U.S.

Read More

Transitioning into industry is not exclusive to PhDs who are extroverts. The number of career opportunities available that are suitable for the strengths that an introvert possesses are vast and growing. If you’re a PhD who hates people and thinks that means you have to stay hunched over in a lab, you’re wrong. By assessing your skills, both technical and transferable, you can find a job that aligns with your strengths and allows you to grow professionally. Here are the top 5 jobs for introverted PhDs in industry.

Read More

Research and development in the biotechnology and biopharmaceutical industries is changing faster than ever before. Medical breakthroughs are happening more frequently and financial pressure and a highly competitive environment has forced major players in this sector to adapt in order to keep up. For PhDs wanting to transition out of academia, it is pivotal to know how these trends apply to the companies you are applying to and, more importantly, be able to discuss them with confidence and ease during networking events and interviews. By combining this knowledge of current industry trends with your already well-established technical skill set, you will be the perfect job candidate.

Read More

Doing a postdoc does not entitle you to a good job. Applying for an academic postdoc may seem like the obvious next step in your career, but it’s not. In fact, doing an academic postdoc could keep you from ever getting an industry job. The competition to get an industry job is intense. Staying in academia longer—becoming more and more removed from the real world—is only going to work against you. On-the-job training is much more valuable than a postdoc. The longer you stay in academia, the more likely you are to end up poor and unhappy. Here’s why.

Read More

Employers are often untrusting of lifetime academics. They are untrusting because they want to know why a PhD, such as yourself, has finally decided to transition into industry. Are you simply frustrated with your academic advisor? Are you simply experimenting? Or are you legitimately ready to add value to their company? It’s okay to want out of academia. In fact, wanting out can keep you motivated in your job search. But this is not enough to out-compete the job candidate sitting next to you in the waiting room before an interview. It’s not enough to beat out the candidate with five years of industry experience. If you really want to stand out you need to show your aptitude for industry trends and how these trends will affect the company you’re applying to, both positively and negatively. Here’s how.

Read More

Your job search strategy is measured by where you put your time. The more time you spend on a particular part of your job search, the more important that part of the job search is to you. The problem is most PhDs spend the majority of their time and energy on writing resumes and practicing scripted interview answers. Here’s the problem—it’s not 1985 anymore. High-level professionals don’t get jobs by sending in a resume and getting invited to an interview anymore. This workflow is obsolete. Every hour you spend crafting your resume and preparing for interviews before networking and creating a job search strategy is a wasted hour. Here’s why.

Read More

Most PhD students don’t have a clue about what’s going on in industry. Do you?

These PhDs do NOT understand the factors, innovations, and breakthroughs that are shaping the current markets in industry. Without knowledge of industry trends such as these, you can come across as naïve and inexperienced at job interviews. You can miss out on job opportunities that you are otherwise trained for. A survey by the Association of Graduate Recruiters found that 67% of employers rated “Commercial Awareness” as the top skill shortage among graduates. Here are 3 industry trends PhDs like you should know.

Read More

PhDs don’t need industry experience to get an industry job.

Consider the new technical skills you mastered throughout the course of your graduate studies. Consider the endless papers you read to develop your hypotheses. Like all PhDs, you know how to find answers, learn new skills, and quickly adapt to changing environments. As such, you should be confident in your ability to transition into an industry career, even if you don’t have any industry experience. Here are 5 tips for transitioning into industry without industry experience.

Read More

Every PhD knows the importance of publishing in academia.

Being a scientific editor allows you to facilitate the communication of scientific advances and while continuing to learn new concepts. According to the Max Planck Society, global scientific output doubles every nine years. A recent STM report shows that the publishing industry employs 110,000 people globally. Scientific curiosity is not diminishing. As a result, distributing scientific information will always be of great importance. Publishing may not be important in industry, but it is an industry in itself and scientific editors are the driving force behind this industry. However, there are some misconceptions in academia about what scientific editors do. If you’re interested in transitioning into a scientific editor position, make sure you know these 5 facts.

Read More

As a PhD, you can’t afford to ignore the facts.

Things are NOT getting better in academia. The number of tenured professors at universities is steadily declining. Even worse, a large portion of non-tenure-track professors live below the poverty line. Yet, reports show that PhDs in the Life Science Industry (not in academia) earn more average income than those employed in other sectors of the economy. The problem is not that research isn’t needed anymore. Research and research scientists are in high demand. The problem is academia. It’s time to start leveraging your skills to get the research job (and income) you deserve. Here are 5 things to keep in mind when pursuing a career as an industry research scientist.

Read More

It’s impossible to get respect in a system that doesn’t value you at all.

Yet, most PhDs latch on to academia as their one and only hope for career success. The truth is a PhDs best option for both success and happiness is to transition OUT of academia. The system is completely broken. If you’re sitting in the middle of your graduate school career or in the middle of your first or second postdoc thinking that things will get better in the next few years, you need to wake up. The academic system is not being fixed. It’s becoming more broken. On top of this, staying in academia is devaluing your PhDs. Academia is a like a tax on your PhD. The longer you stay in the system, the more you are taxed. The time to leave academia is now.If you choose to stay, you’re choosing to throw away your career. Here’s why…

Read More

Why aren’t more PhDs in sales?

The problem is that very few PhDs apply to technical sales positions. Most PhDs fail to apply for one of two reasons. First, they think they need sales experience to get a sales job. Second, they think that salespeople are manipulative or “bad” in some way—like they can’t be a scientist and a salesperson at the same time. Both are incorrect. As a technical salesperson in industry, you can apply your scientific skill sets to a variety of labs and projects. With your PhD in hand, you will maintain your credibility with customers and key opinion leaders, while having more resources and more support to help these professionals solve their problems. If you’re interested in a technical sales position, realize that you have already developed the transferable skills you need to get the job.You don’t need more skills or more experience. You just need to start thinking like a salesperson. Here’s how.

Read More

When it comes to getting an industry job, transferable skills are more important than your technical skills.

No one wants to hire a candidate who is going to be difficult to work with. No one wants to hire a candidate who is going to be the new guy or girl on the team who is awkward to talk to and makes everyone feel uncomfortable. Studies show that hiring managers prefer to hire graduates who demonstrate strong transferable skills over graduates with demonstrate strong technical skills alone. You will not get hired into an industry role if you fail to develop your transferable skills. It doesn’t matter how many impressive publications you have or who your principal investigator is or how glowing your letters of recommendation are. What matters is how easily you can fit into the company’s culture and how quickly you can hit the ground running in your new position. Here are 5 more transferable skills to help you transition into the industry job of your choice.

Read More

Working as an industry research scientist is much different (and better) than working as an academic research scientist.

As an industry research scientist, you will get to do meaningful benchwork and be paid well. Yes, you can have both. Not only can you be paid well and do meaningful work, you can also work with a supportive team in a supportive environment. There are many advantages to working as an industry research scientist over an academic research scientist. The money is nice, but there are many other benefits. Here are the 3 biggest advantages of working as an industry research scientist versus an academic research scientist:

Read More

Transferable job skills are essential for getting into any top industry position.

The problem is most PhD students and postdocs do not fully understand what transferable skills are or how to develop them. More importantly, many of these PhDs are unaware of which transferable skills are sought after by biotech and pharma hiring managers and recruiters. Ignoring these skills can seriously hurt a PhDs chances of landing a job in the biotech or biopharma sector. A survey of major biotech and biopharma companies found that in spite of having the appropriate academic degree and academic qualifications overall, new graduates were hired for less than 15% of all available entry-level job opening. The employers polled in the survey stated that the primary reason for this was the graduates lack of transferable skills. In particular, the main skills these candidates lacked were teamwork, information management, problem-solving, communication and THIS one other skill…

Read More

If you’re a woman and have a PhD or are on your way to having one, the future is yours. The only thing that can hold you back is yourself. The first step to transitioning into industry as a female researcher is knowing your worth and refusing to feel like an impostor. The second step is knowing what you’re up against. The odds may be against you but you can still transition into the non-academic career of your choice by asking the difficult questions and finding a supportive network. By wearing many hats, refusing to apologize for the fact that you’re a woman, and celebrating even the smallest victories—you will be successful. Women scientists are desperately needed in industry, but you have to step up and seize the position you want. Here’s how.

Read More

If you’re waiting for someone to come save you from academia and line up a great industry job for you, you’re going to be waiting a long time.

The only way to get your career back on track is to take matters into your own hands. You must realize that the biggest obstacle between you and getting the industry job of your dreams is yourself. It’s your own bad attitude and bad habits that will keep you unemployed after graduation, nothing else. Stop blaming other people for your situation and start blaming yourself. Take responsibility. Make a decision today to quit making the following 7 mistakes that keep PhD students jobless at graduation.

Read More

When choosing the next step in your career, be sure to consider not only the title and salary you want to have, but the lifestyle you want to live.

PhDs should gain a thorough understanding of their non-academic career options. Otherwise, they will be forced by circumstances to take positions that are not in alignment with their long-term career goals. To help you avoid this fate, we’ve collated a list of the 10 hottest non-academic jobs today. Understanding which industry positions are on the rise will help you see what’s available to you outside of a traditional postdoc or professorship. This will help you get off and stay off the dead end career track you’re currently on. Here are 10 of the hottest industry jobs for science PhDs.

Read More

Cathy was in a tough place. She had been employed for 3 months after getting her PhD and finishing a postdoc. But this wasn’t the end of Cathy’s story.

By making a few intelligent decisions, Cathy turned things around and is now a Cheeky Scientist success story. Wherever you are at in your PhD career–postdoc, graduate student, or even unemployed–you can turn your story into a success story too. Here’s how.

Read More

Every graduate student and technician knows that postdocs are the keepers of the lab.

Postdocs know the most current technologies and methodologies, they know the literature, they know where everything is in the lab, and they know how to get reagents from other labs. Altogether, postdocs know how to get things and how to things done. These are the same skills that make postdocs great industry employees.

Read More

More than anything else, big companies want to hire confident people who understand the system. The problem is that the system in question is different than what most graduate students and postdocs are used to. But this system, like any other, can be mastered. Here are 15 things PhDs can do to make themselves better job candidates for big corporations.

Read More

The first step of transitioning out of academia is deciding if you want to stay in research or if you want out. If you want to stay in research, then you’ll seek and apply for R&D or other bench positions. But, if you want to move into sales, marketing, or upper management, your best course of action is to move into an applications-based position. The main job of an application scientist is to teach a company’s customers how to use their products. This often involves teaching customers about the broader fields of science related to the product. The following 15 tips will help you successfully transition from academia into business.

Read More